Acquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/145689
Title:
Acquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists.
Authors:
Matz, Carsten; Nouri, Bianka; McCarter, Linda; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime
Abstract:
Genome analyses of marine microbial communities have revealed the widespread occurrence of genomic islands (GIs), many of which encode for protein secretion machineries described in the context of bacteria-eukaryote interactions. Yet experimental support for the specific roles of such GIs in aquatic community interactions remains scarce. Here, we test for the contribution of type III secretion systems (T3SS) to the environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Comparisons of V. parahaemolyticus wild types and T3SS-defective mutants demonstrate that the T3SS encoded on genome island VPaI-7 (T3SS-2) promotes survival of V. parahaemolyticus in the interaction with diverse protist taxa. Enhanced persistence was found to be due to T3SS-2 mediated cytotoxicity and facultative parasitism of V. parahaemolyticus on coexisting protists. Growth in the presence of bacterivorous protists and the T3SS-2 genotype showed a strong correlation across environmental and clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. Short-term microcosm experiments provide evidence that protistan hosts facilitate the invasion of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus into a coastal plankton community, and that water temperature and productivity further promote enhanced survival of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus. This study is the first to describe the fitness advantage of GI-encoded functions in a microbial food web, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the global spread and the seasonal dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus pathotypes, including the pandemic serotype cluster O3:K6, in aquatic environments.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Acquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists. 2011, 6 (5):e20275 PLoS ONE
Journal:
PloS one
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/145689
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0020275
PubMed ID:
21629787
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Publications of JRG Chronic Pseudomonas Diseases (CPI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMatz, Carstenen
dc.contributor.authorNouri, Biankaen
dc.contributor.authorMcCarter, Lindaen
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Urtaza, Jaimeen
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-18T14:27:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-10-18T14:27:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationAcquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists. 2011, 6 (5):e20275 PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid21629787-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0020275-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/145689-
dc.description.abstractGenome analyses of marine microbial communities have revealed the widespread occurrence of genomic islands (GIs), many of which encode for protein secretion machineries described in the context of bacteria-eukaryote interactions. Yet experimental support for the specific roles of such GIs in aquatic community interactions remains scarce. Here, we test for the contribution of type III secretion systems (T3SS) to the environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Comparisons of V. parahaemolyticus wild types and T3SS-defective mutants demonstrate that the T3SS encoded on genome island VPaI-7 (T3SS-2) promotes survival of V. parahaemolyticus in the interaction with diverse protist taxa. Enhanced persistence was found to be due to T3SS-2 mediated cytotoxicity and facultative parasitism of V. parahaemolyticus on coexisting protists. Growth in the presence of bacterivorous protists and the T3SS-2 genotype showed a strong correlation across environmental and clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. Short-term microcosm experiments provide evidence that protistan hosts facilitate the invasion of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus into a coastal plankton community, and that water temperature and productivity further promote enhanced survival of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus. This study is the first to describe the fitness advantage of GI-encoded functions in a microbial food web, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the global spread and the seasonal dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus pathotypes, including the pandemic serotype cluster O3:K6, in aquatic environments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAcanthamoeba castellaniien
dc.subject.meshAmoebaen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshCiliophoraen
dc.subject.meshDictyosteliumen
dc.subject.meshTetrahymenaen
dc.subject.meshVibrio parahaemolyticusen
dc.titleAcquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen

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