Generation of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/203912
Title:
Generation of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice.
Authors:
Becker, Pablo D; Legrand, Nicolas; van Geelen, Caroline M M; Noerder, Miriam; Huntington, Nicholas D; Lim, Annick; Yasuda, Etsuko; Diehl, Sean A; Scheeren, Ferenc A; Ott, Michael; Weijer, Kees; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Di Santo, James P; Beaumont, Tim; Guzman, Carlos A; Spits, Hergen
Abstract:
Passive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the 'humanization' of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of potentially altering antigenic specificity and/or affinity. The immortalization of human B cells represents an alternative for obtaining human mAbs, but relies on the availability of biological samples from vaccinated individuals or convalescent patients. In this work we describe a novel approach to generate fully human mAbs by combining a humanized mouse model with a new B cell immortalization technique.
Affiliation:
Department of Vaccinology and Applied Microbiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Generation of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice. 2010, 5 (10) PLoS ONE
Journal:
PloS one
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/203912
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0013137
PubMed ID:
20957227
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Publications of Dept. Cell Biology (ZB)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Pablo Den
dc.contributor.authorLegrand, Nicolasen
dc.contributor.authorvan Geelen, Caroline M Men
dc.contributor.authorNoerder, Miriamen
dc.contributor.authorHuntington, Nicholas Den
dc.contributor.authorLim, Annicken
dc.contributor.authorYasuda, Etsukoen
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, Sean Aen
dc.contributor.authorScheeren, Ferenc Aen
dc.contributor.authorOtt, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorWeijer, Keesen
dc.contributor.authorWedemeyer, Heineren
dc.contributor.authorDi Santo, James Pen
dc.contributor.authorBeaumont, Timen
dc.contributor.authorGuzman, Carlos Aen
dc.contributor.authorSpits, Hergenen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T14:33:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-20T14:33:28Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationGeneration of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice. 2010, 5 (10) PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid20957227-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0013137-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/203912-
dc.description.abstractPassive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the 'humanization' of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of potentially altering antigenic specificity and/or affinity. The immortalization of human B cells represents an alternative for obtaining human mAbs, but relies on the availability of biological samples from vaccinated individuals or convalescent patients. In this work we describe a novel approach to generate fully human mAbs by combining a humanized mouse model with a new B cell immortalization technique.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonalen
dc.subject.meshB-Lymphocytesen
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Transformeden
dc.subject.meshCell Separationen
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assayen
dc.subject.meshFlow Cytometryen
dc.subject.meshImmune Systemen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Men
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred BALB Cen
dc.titleGeneration of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Vaccinology and Applied Microbiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen

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