2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/24352
Title:
Invasion mechanisms of Gram-positive pathogenic cocci.
Authors:
Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Rohde, Manfred; Chhatwal, Gursharan S
Abstract:
Gram-positive cocci are important human pathogens. Streptococci and staphylococci in particular are a major threat to human health, since they cause a variety of serious invasive infections. Their invasion into normally sterile sites of the host depends on elaborated bacterial mechanisms that involve adhesion to the host tissue, its degradation, internalisation by host cells, and passage through epithelia and endothelia. Interactions of bacterial surface proteins with proteins of the host's extracellular matrix as well as with cell surface receptors are crucial factors in these processes, and some of the key mechanisms are similar in many pathogenic Gram-positive cocci. Therapies that interfere with these mechanisms may become efficient alternatives to today's antibiotic treatments.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Microbial Pathogenesis, Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Invasion mechanisms of Gram-positive pathogenic cocci. 2007, 98 (3):488-96 Thromb. Haemost.
Journal:
Thrombosis and haemostasis
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/24352
PubMed ID:
17849036
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0340-6245
Appears in Collections:
Publications of Dept. Medizinische Mikrobiologie (MMIK)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNitsche-Schmitz, D Patric-
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Manfred-
dc.contributor.authorChhatwal, Gursharan S-
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-29T08:59:29Z-
dc.date.available2008-04-29T08:59:29Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationInvasion mechanisms of Gram-positive pathogenic cocci. 2007, 98 (3):488-96 Thromb. Haemost.en
dc.identifier.issn0340-6245-
dc.identifier.pmid17849036-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/24352-
dc.description.abstractGram-positive cocci are important human pathogens. Streptococci and staphylococci in particular are a major threat to human health, since they cause a variety of serious invasive infections. Their invasion into normally sterile sites of the host depends on elaborated bacterial mechanisms that involve adhesion to the host tissue, its degradation, internalisation by host cells, and passage through epithelia and endothelia. Interactions of bacterial surface proteins with proteins of the host's extracellular matrix as well as with cell surface receptors are crucial factors in these processes, and some of the key mechanisms are similar in many pathogenic Gram-positive cocci. Therapies that interfere with these mechanisms may become efficient alternatives to today's antibiotic treatments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdhesins, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Adhesionen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Outer Membrane Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Translocationen
dc.subject.meshCarrier Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshCaveolaeen
dc.subject.meshEndocytosisen
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHydrolasesen
dc.subject.meshPhagocytesen
dc.subject.meshPhagocytosisen
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcusen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcusen
dc.titleInvasion mechanisms of Gram-positive pathogenic cocci.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Microbial Pathogenesis, Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalThrombosis and haemostasisen

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.