The YfiBNR signal transduction mechanism reveals novel targets for the evolution of persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways.

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/247139
Title:
The YfiBNR signal transduction mechanism reveals novel targets for the evolution of persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways.
Authors:
Malone, Jacob G; Jaeger, Tina; Manfredi, Pablo; Dötsch, Andreas; Blanka, Andrea; Bos, Raphael; Cornelis, Guy R; Häussler, Susanne; Jenal, Urs
Abstract:
The genetic adaptation of pathogens in host tissue plays a key role in the establishment of chronic infections. While whole genome sequencing has opened up the analysis of genetic changes occurring during long-term infections, the identification and characterization of adaptive traits is often obscured by a lack of knowledge of the underlying molecular processes. Our research addresses the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa small colony variant (SCV) morphotypes in long-term infections. In the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, the appearance of SCVs correlates with a prolonged persistence of infection and poor lung function. Formation of P. aeruginosa SCVs is linked to increased levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Our previous work identified the YfiBNR system as a key regulator of the SCV phenotype. The effector of this tripartite signaling module is the membrane bound diguanylate cyclase YfiN. Through a combination of genetic and biochemical analyses we first outline the mechanistic principles of YfiN regulation in detail. In particular, we identify a number of activating mutations in all three components of the Yfi regulatory system. YfiBNR is shown to function via tightly controlled competition between allosteric binding sites on the three Yfi proteins; a novel regulatory mechanism that is apparently widespread among periplasmic signaling systems in bacteria. We then show that during long-term lung infections of CF patients, activating mutations invade the population, driving SCV formation in vivo. The identification of mutational "scars" in the yfi genes of clinical isolates suggests that Yfi activity is both under positive and negative selection in vivo and that continuous adaptation of the c-di-GMP network contributes to the in vivo fitness of P. aeruginosa during chronic lung infections. These experiments uncover an important new principle of in vivo persistence, and identify the c-di-GMP network as a valid target for novel anti-infectives directed against chronic infections.
Affiliation:
Biozentrum of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Citation:
The YfiBNR signal transduction mechanism reveals novel targets for the evolution of persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways. 2012, 8 (6):e1002760 PLoS Pathog.
Journal:
PLoS pathogens
Issue Date:
Jun-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/247139
DOI:
10.1371/journal.ppat.1002760
PubMed ID:
22719254
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1553-7374
Appears in Collections:
publications of the TwinCore unit pathophysiology of biofilms

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Jacob Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJaeger, Tinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManfredi, Pabloen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDötsch, Andreasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlanka, Andreaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBos, Raphaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCornelis, Guy Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHäussler, Susanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJenal, Ursen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-05T09:35:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-05T09:35:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-06-
dc.identifier.citationThe YfiBNR signal transduction mechanism reveals novel targets for the evolution of persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways. 2012, 8 (6):e1002760 PLoS Pathog.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1553-7374-
dc.identifier.pmid22719254-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1002760-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/247139-
dc.description.abstractThe genetic adaptation of pathogens in host tissue plays a key role in the establishment of chronic infections. While whole genome sequencing has opened up the analysis of genetic changes occurring during long-term infections, the identification and characterization of adaptive traits is often obscured by a lack of knowledge of the underlying molecular processes. Our research addresses the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa small colony variant (SCV) morphotypes in long-term infections. In the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, the appearance of SCVs correlates with a prolonged persistence of infection and poor lung function. Formation of P. aeruginosa SCVs is linked to increased levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Our previous work identified the YfiBNR system as a key regulator of the SCV phenotype. The effector of this tripartite signaling module is the membrane bound diguanylate cyclase YfiN. Through a combination of genetic and biochemical analyses we first outline the mechanistic principles of YfiN regulation in detail. In particular, we identify a number of activating mutations in all three components of the Yfi regulatory system. YfiBNR is shown to function via tightly controlled competition between allosteric binding sites on the three Yfi proteins; a novel regulatory mechanism that is apparently widespread among periplasmic signaling systems in bacteria. We then show that during long-term lung infections of CF patients, activating mutations invade the population, driving SCV formation in vivo. The identification of mutational "scars" in the yfi genes of clinical isolates suggests that Yfi activity is both under positive and negative selection in vivo and that continuous adaptation of the c-di-GMP network contributes to the in vivo fitness of P. aeruginosa during chronic lung infections. These experiments uncover an important new principle of in vivo persistence, and identify the c-di-GMP network as a valid target for novel anti-infectives directed against chronic infections.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS pathogensen_GB
dc.titleThe YfiBNR signal transduction mechanism reveals novel targets for the evolution of persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiozentrum of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPLoS pathogensen_GB

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