2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/267833
Title:
Terahertz electromagnetic fields (0.106 THz) do not induce manifest genomic damage in vitro.
Authors:
Hintzsche, Henning; Jastrow, Christian; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Kärst, Uwe; Schrader, Thorsten; Stopper, Helga
Abstract:
Terahertz electromagnetic fields are non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the frequency range from 0.1 to 10 THz. Potential applications of these electromagnetic fields include the whole body scanners, which currently apply millimeter waves just below the terahertz range, but future scanners will use higher frequencies in the terahertz range. These and other applications will bring along human exposure to these fields. Up to now, only a limited number of investigations on biological effects of terahertz electromagnetic fields have been performed. Therefore, research is strongly needed to enable reliable risk assessment.Cells were exposed for 2 h, 8 h, and 24 h with different power intensities ranging from 0.04 mW/cm(2) to 2 mW/cm(2), representing levels below, at, and above current safety limits. Genomic damage on the chromosomal level was measured as micronucleus formation. DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were quantified with the comet assay. No DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites were observed as a consequence of exposure to terahertz electromagnetic fields in the comet assay. The fields did not cause chromosomal damage in the form of micronucleus induction.
Affiliation:
Institut für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
Citation:
Terahertz electromagnetic fields (0.106 THz) do not induce manifest genomic damage in vitro. 2012, 7 (9):e46397 PLoS ONE
Journal:
PloS one
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/267833
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0046397
PubMed ID:
23029508
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Publications of RG Cellular Proteome Research (CPRO)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHintzsche, Henningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJastrow, Christianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKleine-Ostmann, Thomasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKärst, Uween_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchrader, Thorstenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStopper, Helgaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-31T12:25:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-31T12:25:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationTerahertz electromagnetic fields (0.106 THz) do not induce manifest genomic damage in vitro. 2012, 7 (9):e46397 PLoS ONEen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid23029508-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0046397-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/267833-
dc.description.abstractTerahertz electromagnetic fields are non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the frequency range from 0.1 to 10 THz. Potential applications of these electromagnetic fields include the whole body scanners, which currently apply millimeter waves just below the terahertz range, but future scanners will use higher frequencies in the terahertz range. These and other applications will bring along human exposure to these fields. Up to now, only a limited number of investigations on biological effects of terahertz electromagnetic fields have been performed. Therefore, research is strongly needed to enable reliable risk assessment.Cells were exposed for 2 h, 8 h, and 24 h with different power intensities ranging from 0.04 mW/cm(2) to 2 mW/cm(2), representing levels below, at, and above current safety limits. Genomic damage on the chromosomal level was measured as micronucleus formation. DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were quantified with the comet assay. No DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites were observed as a consequence of exposure to terahertz electromagnetic fields in the comet assay. The fields did not cause chromosomal damage in the form of micronucleus induction.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PloS oneen_GB
dc.titleTerahertz electromagnetic fields (0.106 THz) do not induce manifest genomic damage in vitro.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitut für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen_GB

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