Ex vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/279512
Title:
Ex vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites.
Authors:
Bielecki, Piotr; Komor, Uliana; Bielecka, Agata; Müsken, Mathias; Puchałka, Jacek; Pletz, Mathias W; Ballmann, Manfred; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne; Bielecki, Piotr; Komor, Uliana; Bielecka, Agata; Müsken, Mathias; Puchałka, Jacek; Pletz, Mathias W; Ballmann, Manfred; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne
Abstract:
The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen causing both devastating acute and chronic persistent infections. During the course of an infection, P.  aeruginosa rapidly adapts to the specific conditions within the host. In the present study, we aimed at the identification of genes that are highly expressed during biofilm infections such as in chronically infected lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), burn wounds and subcutaneous mouse tumours. We found a common subset of differentially regulated genes in all three in vivo habitats and evaluated whether their inactivation impacts on the bacterial capability to form biofilms in vitro and to establish biofilm-associated infections in a murine model. Additive effects on biofilm formation and host colonization were discovered by the combined inactivation of several highly expressed genes. However, even combined inactivation was not sufficient to abolish the establishment of an infection completely. These findings can be interpreted as evidence that either redundant traits encode functions that are essential for in vivo survival and chronic biofilm infections and/or bacterial adaptation is considerably achieved independently of transcription levels. Supplemental screens, will have to be applied in order to identify the minimal set of key genes essential for the establishment of chronic infectious diseases.; The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen causing both devastating acute and chronic persistent infections. During the course of an infection, P.  aeruginosa rapidly adapts to the specific conditions within the host. In the present study, we aimed at the identification of genes that are highly expressed during biofilm infections such as in chronically infected lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), burn wounds and subcutaneous mouse tumours. We found a common subset of differentially regulated genes in all three in vivo habitats and evaluated whether their inactivation impacts on the bacterial capability to form biofilms in vitro and to establish biofilm-associated infections in a murine model. Additive effects on biofilm formation and host colonization were discovered by the combined inactivation of several highly expressed genes. However, even combined inactivation was not sufficient to abolish the establishment of an infection completely. These findings can be interpreted as evidence that either redundant traits encode functions that are essential for in vivo survival and chronic biofilm infections and/or bacterial adaptation is considerably achieved independently of transcription levels. Supplemental screens, will have to be applied in order to identify the minimal set of key genes essential for the establishment of chronic infectious diseases.
Affiliation:
Institute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Center for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, a joint venture of the Helmholtz Center of Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 30625, Germany.; Institute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Center for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, a joint venture of the Helmholtz Center of Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 30625, Germany.
Citation:
Ex vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites. 2013, 15 (2):570-87 Environ. Microbiol.; Ex vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites. 2013, 15 (2):570-87 Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Environmental microbiology; Environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
Feb-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/279512
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.12024
PubMed ID:
23145907
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-2920
Appears in Collections:
publications of the departmentment of molecular bacteriology(MOBA)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBielecki, Piotren_GB
dc.contributor.authorKomor, Ulianaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBielecka, Agataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMüsken, Mathiasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPuchałka, Jaceken_GB
dc.contributor.authorPletz, Mathias Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBallmann, Manfreden_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartins dos Santos, Vítor A Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Siegfrieden_GB
dc.contributor.authorHäussler, Susanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBielecki, Piotren
dc.contributor.authorKomor, Ulianaen
dc.contributor.authorBielecka, Agataen
dc.contributor.authorMüsken, Mathiasen
dc.contributor.authorPuchałka, Jaceken
dc.contributor.authorPletz, Mathias Wen
dc.contributor.authorBallmann, Manfreden
dc.contributor.authorMartins dos Santos, Vítor A Pen
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Siegfrieden
dc.contributor.authorHäussler, Susanneen
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T13:17:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-09T13:17:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-02-
dc.identifier.citationEx vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites. 2013, 15 (2):570-87 Environ. Microbiol.en_GB
dc.identifier.citationEx vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites. 2013, 15 (2):570-87 Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920-
dc.identifier.pmid23145907-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.12024-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/279512-
dc.description.abstractThe opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen causing both devastating acute and chronic persistent infections. During the course of an infection, P.  aeruginosa rapidly adapts to the specific conditions within the host. In the present study, we aimed at the identification of genes that are highly expressed during biofilm infections such as in chronically infected lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), burn wounds and subcutaneous mouse tumours. We found a common subset of differentially regulated genes in all three in vivo habitats and evaluated whether their inactivation impacts on the bacterial capability to form biofilms in vitro and to establish biofilm-associated infections in a murine model. Additive effects on biofilm formation and host colonization were discovered by the combined inactivation of several highly expressed genes. However, even combined inactivation was not sufficient to abolish the establishment of an infection completely. These findings can be interpreted as evidence that either redundant traits encode functions that are essential for in vivo survival and chronic biofilm infections and/or bacterial adaptation is considerably achieved independently of transcription levels. Supplemental screens, will have to be applied in order to identify the minimal set of key genes essential for the establishment of chronic infectious diseases.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen causing both devastating acute and chronic persistent infections. During the course of an infection, P.  aeruginosa rapidly adapts to the specific conditions within the host. In the present study, we aimed at the identification of genes that are highly expressed during biofilm infections such as in chronically infected lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), burn wounds and subcutaneous mouse tumours. We found a common subset of differentially regulated genes in all three in vivo habitats and evaluated whether their inactivation impacts on the bacterial capability to form biofilms in vitro and to establish biofilm-associated infections in a murine model. Additive effects on biofilm formation and host colonization were discovered by the combined inactivation of several highly expressed genes. However, even combined inactivation was not sufficient to abolish the establishment of an infection completely. These findings can be interpreted as evidence that either redundant traits encode functions that are essential for in vivo survival and chronic biofilm infections and/or bacterial adaptation is considerably achieved independently of transcription levels. Supplemental screens, will have to be applied in order to identify the minimal set of key genes essential for the establishment of chronic infectious diseases.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relationeu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/260276en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environmental microbiologyen_GB
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.titleEx vivo transcriptional profiling reveals a common set of genes important for the adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chronically infected host sites.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Center for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, a joint venture of the Helmholtz Center of Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 30625, Germany.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Center for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, a joint venture of the Helmholtz Center of Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 30625, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen

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