Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/295225
Title:
Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria.
Authors:
Brock, Nelson L; Citron, Christian A; Zell, Claudia; Berger, Martine; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Petersen, Jörn; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Dickschat, Jeroen S
Abstract:
Members of the marine Roseobacter clade can degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) via competing pathways releasing either methanethiol (MeSH) or dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Deuterium-labeled [(2)H6]DMSP and the synthetic DMSP analogue dimethyltelluriopropionate (DMTeP) were used in feeding experiments with the Roseobacter clade members Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 and Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, and their volatile metabolites were analyzed by closed-loop stripping and solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC-MS. Feeding experiments with [(2)H6]DMSP resulted in the incorporation of a deuterium label into MeSH and DMS. Knockout of relevant genes from the known DMSP demethylation pathway to MeSH showed in both species a residual production of [(2)H3]MeSH, suggesting that a second demethylation pathway is active. The role of DMSP degradation pathways for MeSH and DMS formation was further investigated by using the synthetic analogue DMTeP as a probe in feeding experiments with the wild-type strain and knockout mutants. Feeding of DMTeP to the R. pomeroyi knockout mutant resulted in a diminished, but not abolished production of demethylation pathway products. These results further corroborated the proposed second demethylation activity in R. pomeroyi. Isotopically labeled [(2)H3]methionine and (34)SO4 (2-), synthesized from elemental (34)S8, were tested to identify alternative sulfur sources besides DMSP for the MeSH production in P. gallaeciensis. Methionine proved to be a viable sulfur source for the MeSH volatiles, whereas incorporation of labeling from sulfate was not observed. Moreover, the utilization of selenite and selenate salts by marine alphaproteobacteria for the production of methylated selenium volatiles was explored and resulted in the production of numerous methaneselenol-derived volatiles via reduction and methylation. The pathway of selenate/selenite reduction, however, proved to be strictly separated from sulfate reduction.
Affiliation:
Institute of Organic Chemistry, TU Braunschweig, Hagenring 30, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria. 2013, 9:942-50 Beilstein J Org Chem
Journal:
Beilstein journal of organic chemistry
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/295225
DOI:
10.3762/bjoc.9.108
PubMed ID:
23766810
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1860-5397
Appears in Collections:
collections of the research group microbial communication (KOM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrock, Nelson Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorCitron, Christian Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZell, Claudiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Martineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWagner-Döbler, Ireneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Jörnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrinkhoff, Thorstenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Meinharden_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickschat, Jeroen Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-04T13:27:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-04T13:27:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationIsotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria. 2013, 9:942-50 Beilstein J Org Chemen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1860-5397-
dc.identifier.pmid23766810-
dc.identifier.doi10.3762/bjoc.9.108-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/295225-
dc.description.abstractMembers of the marine Roseobacter clade can degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) via competing pathways releasing either methanethiol (MeSH) or dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Deuterium-labeled [(2)H6]DMSP and the synthetic DMSP analogue dimethyltelluriopropionate (DMTeP) were used in feeding experiments with the Roseobacter clade members Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 and Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, and their volatile metabolites were analyzed by closed-loop stripping and solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC-MS. Feeding experiments with [(2)H6]DMSP resulted in the incorporation of a deuterium label into MeSH and DMS. Knockout of relevant genes from the known DMSP demethylation pathway to MeSH showed in both species a residual production of [(2)H3]MeSH, suggesting that a second demethylation pathway is active. The role of DMSP degradation pathways for MeSH and DMS formation was further investigated by using the synthetic analogue DMTeP as a probe in feeding experiments with the wild-type strain and knockout mutants. Feeding of DMTeP to the R. pomeroyi knockout mutant resulted in a diminished, but not abolished production of demethylation pathway products. These results further corroborated the proposed second demethylation activity in R. pomeroyi. Isotopically labeled [(2)H3]methionine and (34)SO4 (2-), synthesized from elemental (34)S8, were tested to identify alternative sulfur sources besides DMSP for the MeSH production in P. gallaeciensis. Methionine proved to be a viable sulfur source for the MeSH volatiles, whereas incorporation of labeling from sulfate was not observed. Moreover, the utilization of selenite and selenate salts by marine alphaproteobacteria for the production of methylated selenium volatiles was explored and resulted in the production of numerous methaneselenol-derived volatiles via reduction and methylation. The pathway of selenate/selenite reduction, however, proved to be strictly separated from sulfate reduction.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Beilstein journal of organic chemistryen_GB
dc.titleIsotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Organic Chemistry, TU Braunschweig, Hagenring 30, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBeilstein journal of organic chemistryen_GB

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.