2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/305721
Title:
Particle based vaccine formulations for transcutaneous immunization.
Authors:
Mittal, Ankit; Raber, Anne S; Hansen, Steffi
Abstract:
Vaccine formulations on the basis of nano- (NP) or microparticles (MP) can solve issues with stabilization, controlled release, and poor immunogenicity of antigens. Likewise transcutaneous immunization (TCI) promises superior immunogenicity as well as the advantages of needle-free application compared with conventional intramuscular injections. Thus the combination of both strategies seems to be a very valuable approach. However, until now TCI using particle based vaccine formulations has made no impact on medical practice. One of the main difficulties is that NPs and MPs cannot penetrate the skin to an extent that would allow the application of the required dose of antigen. This is due to the formidable stratum corneum (SC) barrier, the limited amount of antigen in the formulation and often an insufficient immunogenicity. A multitude of strategies are currently under investigation to overcome these issues. We highlight selected methods presenting a spectrum of solutions ranging from transfollicular delivery, to devices disrupting the SC barrier and the combination of particle based vaccines with adjuvants discussing their advantages and shortcomings. Some of these are currently at an experimental state while others are already in clinical testing. All methods have been shown to be capable of transcutaneous antigen delivery.
Affiliation:
Biopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology; Saarland University; Saarbruecken, Germany.
Citation:
Particle based vaccine formulations for transcutaneous immunization. 2013, 9 (9): Hum Vaccin Immunother
Journal:
Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics
Issue Date:
18-Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/305721
PubMed ID:
23778884
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2164-554X
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department drug delivery ([TC] DDEL)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMittal, Ankiten
dc.contributor.authorRaber, Anne Sen
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Steffien
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-25T10:00:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-25T10:00:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-18-
dc.identifier.citationParticle based vaccine formulations for transcutaneous immunization. 2013, 9 (9): Hum Vaccin Immunotheren
dc.identifier.issn2164-554X-
dc.identifier.pmid23778884-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/305721-
dc.description.abstractVaccine formulations on the basis of nano- (NP) or microparticles (MP) can solve issues with stabilization, controlled release, and poor immunogenicity of antigens. Likewise transcutaneous immunization (TCI) promises superior immunogenicity as well as the advantages of needle-free application compared with conventional intramuscular injections. Thus the combination of both strategies seems to be a very valuable approach. However, until now TCI using particle based vaccine formulations has made no impact on medical practice. One of the main difficulties is that NPs and MPs cannot penetrate the skin to an extent that would allow the application of the required dose of antigen. This is due to the formidable stratum corneum (SC) barrier, the limited amount of antigen in the formulation and often an insufficient immunogenicity. A multitude of strategies are currently under investigation to overcome these issues. We highlight selected methods presenting a spectrum of solutions ranging from transfollicular delivery, to devices disrupting the SC barrier and the combination of particle based vaccines with adjuvants discussing their advantages and shortcomings. Some of these are currently at an experimental state while others are already in clinical testing. All methods have been shown to be capable of transcutaneous antigen delivery.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Human vaccines & immunotherapeuticsen
dc.titleParticle based vaccine formulations for transcutaneous immunization.-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology; Saarland University; Saarbruecken, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalHuman vaccines & immunotherapeuticsen

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