Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/320793
Title:
Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus.
Authors:
Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Andreas; Abou, Bérengère; Hopf, Alexander; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Schneider, Marc; Schall, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Lehr, Claus-Michael
Abstract:
In this study, the mobility of nanoparticles in mucus and similar hydrogels as model systems was assessed to elucidate the link between microscopic diffusion behavior and macroscopic penetration of such gels. Differences in particle adhesion to mucus components were strongly dependent on particle coating. Particles coated with 2 kDa PEG exhibited a decreased adhesion to mucus components, whereas chitosan strongly increased the adhesion. Despite such mucoinert properties of PEG, magnetic nanoparticles of both coatings did not penetrate through native respiratory mucus, resisting high magnetic forces (even for several hours). However, model hydrogels were, indeed, penetrated by both particles in dependency of particle coating, obeying the theory of particle mobility in an external force field. Comparison of penetration data with cryogenic scanning EM images of mucus and the applied model systems suggested particularly high rigidity of the mucin scaffold and a broad pore size distribution in mucus as reasons for the observed particle immobilization. Active probing of the rigidity of mucus and model gels with optical tweezers was used in this context to confirm such properties of mucus on the microscale, thus presenting the missing link between micro- and macroscopical observations. Because of high heterogeneity in the size of the voids and pores in mucus, on small scales, particle mobility will depend on adhesive or inert properties. However, particle translocation over distances larger than a few micrometers is restricted by highly rigid structures within the mucus mesh.
Citation:
Optical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus. 2012, 109 (45):18355-60 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Issue Date:
6-Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/320793
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1214066109
PubMed ID:
23091027
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1091-6490
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department drug delivery ([TC] DDEL)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKirch, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorAbou, Bérengèreen
dc.contributor.authorHopf, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorSchaefer, Ulrich Fen
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorSchall, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorLehr, Claus-Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-11T12:57:10Zen
dc.date.available2014-06-11T12:57:10Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11-06en
dc.identifier.citationOptical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus. 2012, 109 (45):18355-60 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.en
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490en
dc.identifier.pmid23091027en
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1214066109en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/320793en
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the mobility of nanoparticles in mucus and similar hydrogels as model systems was assessed to elucidate the link between microscopic diffusion behavior and macroscopic penetration of such gels. Differences in particle adhesion to mucus components were strongly dependent on particle coating. Particles coated with 2 kDa PEG exhibited a decreased adhesion to mucus components, whereas chitosan strongly increased the adhesion. Despite such mucoinert properties of PEG, magnetic nanoparticles of both coatings did not penetrate through native respiratory mucus, resisting high magnetic forces (even for several hours). However, model hydrogels were, indeed, penetrated by both particles in dependency of particle coating, obeying the theory of particle mobility in an external force field. Comparison of penetration data with cryogenic scanning EM images of mucus and the applied model systems suggested particularly high rigidity of the mucin scaffold and a broad pore size distribution in mucus as reasons for the observed particle immobilization. Active probing of the rigidity of mucus and model gels with optical tweezers was used in this context to confirm such properties of mucus on the microscale, thus presenting the missing link between micro- and macroscopical observations. Because of high heterogeneity in the size of the voids and pores in mucus, on small scales, particle mobility will depend on adhesive or inert properties. However, particle translocation over distances larger than a few micrometers is restricted by highly rigid structures within the mucus mesh.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen
dc.subject.meshCelluloseen
dc.subject.meshCryoelectron Microscopyen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHydrogelsen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Phenomenaen
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Atomic Forceen
dc.subject.meshMucusen
dc.subject.meshNanoparticlesen
dc.subject.meshOptical Tweezersen
dc.subject.meshParticle Sizeen
dc.subject.meshPolyethylene Glycolsen
dc.subject.meshRheologyen
dc.titleOptical tweezers reveal relationship between microstructure and nanoparticle penetration of pulmonary mucus.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen

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