2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/337993
Title:
Age-dependent enterocyte invasion and microcolony formation by Salmonella.
Authors:
Zhang, Kaiyi; Dupont, Aline; Torow, Natalia; Gohde, Fredrik; Leschner, Sara; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kühnel, Mark; Hensel, Michael; Fulde, Marcus; Hornef, Mathias W
Abstract:
The coordinated action of a variety of virulence factors allows Salmonella enterica to invade epithelial cells and penetrate the mucosal barrier. The influence of the age-dependent maturation of the mucosal barrier for microbial pathogenesis has not been investigated. Here, we analyzed Salmonella infection of neonate mice after oral administration. In contrast to the situation in adult animals, we observed spontaneous colonization, massive invasion of enteroabsorptive cells, intraepithelial proliferation and the formation of large intraepithelial microcolonies. Mucosal translocation was dependent on enterocyte invasion in neonates in the absence of microfold (M) cells. It further resulted in potent innate immune stimulation in the absence of pronounced neutrophil-dominated pathology. Our results identify factors of age-dependent host susceptibility and provide important insight in the early steps of Salmonella infection in vivo. We also present a new small animal model amenable to genetic manipulation of the host for the analysis of the Salmonella enterocyte interaction in vivo.
Citation:
Age-dependent enterocyte invasion and microcolony formation by Salmonella. 2014, 10 (9):e1004385 PLoS Pathog.
Journal:
PLoS pathogens
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/337993
DOI:
10.1371/journal.ppat.1004385
PubMed ID:
25210785
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1553-7374
Appears in Collections:
junior research group immunomodulation (VIMM); publications of the research group viral immunomodulation (VIMM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Kaiyien
dc.contributor.authorDupont, Alineen
dc.contributor.authorTorow, Nataliaen
dc.contributor.authorGohde, Fredriken
dc.contributor.authorLeschner, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorLienenklaus, Stefanen
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Siegfrieden
dc.contributor.authorBrinkmann, Melanie Men
dc.contributor.authorKühnel, Marken
dc.contributor.authorHensel, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorFulde, Marcusen
dc.contributor.authorHornef, Mathias Wen
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-09T15:35:49Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-09T15:35:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-
dc.identifier.citationAge-dependent enterocyte invasion and microcolony formation by Salmonella. 2014, 10 (9):e1004385 PLoS Pathog.en
dc.identifier.issn1553-7374-
dc.identifier.pmid25210785-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1004385-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/337993-
dc.description.abstractThe coordinated action of a variety of virulence factors allows Salmonella enterica to invade epithelial cells and penetrate the mucosal barrier. The influence of the age-dependent maturation of the mucosal barrier for microbial pathogenesis has not been investigated. Here, we analyzed Salmonella infection of neonate mice after oral administration. In contrast to the situation in adult animals, we observed spontaneous colonization, massive invasion of enteroabsorptive cells, intraepithelial proliferation and the formation of large intraepithelial microcolonies. Mucosal translocation was dependent on enterocyte invasion in neonates in the absence of microfold (M) cells. It further resulted in potent innate immune stimulation in the absence of pronounced neutrophil-dominated pathology. Our results identify factors of age-dependent host susceptibility and provide important insight in the early steps of Salmonella infection in vivo. We also present a new small animal model amenable to genetic manipulation of the host for the analysis of the Salmonella enterocyte interaction in vivo.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleAge-dependent enterocyte invasion and microcolony formation by Salmonella.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS pathogensen

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