Identification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/344051
Title:
Identification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria.
Authors:
Wensing, A; Gernold, M; Jock, S; Jansen, R; Geider, K
Abstract:
We identified a compound in culture supernatants of Erwinia species, such as Erwinia amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis, E. persicina and E. rhapontici absorbing at 340 nm, which was associated before with the yellow pigment produced by E. amylovora on media containing copper ions. The compound was purified from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 supernatants by chromatography on Dowex-1 and Dowex-50 columns and identified by HPLC/MS and NMR analysis as 6-thioguanine (6TG). Its signal at 167 Da matched with the expected molecular mass. By random mutagenesis with miniTn5, we obtained mutants defective in the genes for pyrimidine and purine metabolism. A specific gene cluster with ycf genes described by us before, absent in the corresponding region of Escherichia coli, was identified in the genome sequence of three Erwinia species and named tgs region for thioguanine synthesis. Clones of the tgs gene cluster promoted 6TG synthesis and secretion in E. coli, when the bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with amino acids. 6TG was bacteriostatic for E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium strains, with cell growth resumed after prolonged incubation. Similar results were obtained with P. agglomerans strains. Bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium were barely and Rahnella or Gibbsiella species were not inhibited by 6TG. Adenine and guanine relieved the toxic effect of 6TG on E. coli. Non-producing strains were fully virulent on host plants. 6TG synthesis may help erwinias to interfere with growth of some microorganisms in the environment.
Citation:
Identification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria. 2014, 289 (2):215-23 Mol. Genet. Genomics
Journal:
Molecular genetics and genomics : MGG
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/344051
DOI:
10.1007/s00438-013-0805-1
PubMed ID:
24374865
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
1617-4623
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of microbial drugs (MWIS)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWensing, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGernold, Men
dc.contributor.authorJock, Sen
dc.contributor.authorJansen, Ren
dc.contributor.authorGeider, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T14:23:15Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-02T14:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.identifier.citationIdentification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria. 2014, 289 (2):215-23 Mol. Genet. Genomicsen
dc.identifier.issn1617-4623-
dc.identifier.pmid24374865-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00438-013-0805-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/344051-
dc.description.abstractWe identified a compound in culture supernatants of Erwinia species, such as Erwinia amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis, E. persicina and E. rhapontici absorbing at 340 nm, which was associated before with the yellow pigment produced by E. amylovora on media containing copper ions. The compound was purified from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 supernatants by chromatography on Dowex-1 and Dowex-50 columns and identified by HPLC/MS and NMR analysis as 6-thioguanine (6TG). Its signal at 167 Da matched with the expected molecular mass. By random mutagenesis with miniTn5, we obtained mutants defective in the genes for pyrimidine and purine metabolism. A specific gene cluster with ycf genes described by us before, absent in the corresponding region of Escherichia coli, was identified in the genome sequence of three Erwinia species and named tgs region for thioguanine synthesis. Clones of the tgs gene cluster promoted 6TG synthesis and secretion in E. coli, when the bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with amino acids. 6TG was bacteriostatic for E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium strains, with cell growth resumed after prolonged incubation. Similar results were obtained with P. agglomerans strains. Bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium were barely and Rahnella or Gibbsiella species were not inhibited by 6TG. Adenine and guanine relieved the toxic effect of 6TG on E. coli. Non-producing strains were fully virulent on host plants. 6TG synthesis may help erwinias to interfere with growth of some microorganisms in the environment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshErwiniaen
dc.subject.meshEscherichia colien
dc.subject.meshEscherichia coli Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Spectroscopyen
dc.subject.meshMalusen
dc.subject.meshMultigene Familyen
dc.subject.meshMutationen
dc.subject.meshPlant Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshThioguanineen
dc.subject.meshVirulenceen
dc.titleIdentification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria.en
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular genetics and genomics : MGGen

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