2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/347155
Title:
Intestinal microbiota, evolution of the immune system and the bad reputation of pro-inflammatory immunity.
Authors:
Ohnmacht, Caspar; Marques, Rute; Presley, Laura; Sawa, Shinichiro; Lochner, Matthias; Eberl, Gérard
Abstract:
The mammalian intestine provides a unique niche for a large community of bacterial symbionts that complements the host in digestive and anabolic pathways, as well as in protection from pathogens. Only a few bacterial phyla have adapted to this predominantly anaerobic environment, but hundreds of different species create an ecosystem that affects many facets of the host's physiology. Recent data show how particular symbionts are involved in the maturation of the immune system, in the intestine and beyond, and how dysbiosis, or alteration of that community, can deregulate immunity and lead to immunopathology. The extensive and dynamic interactions between the symbionts and the immune system are key to homeostasis and health, and require all the blends of so-called regulatory and pro-inflammatory immune reactions. Unfortunately, pro-inflammatory immunity leading to the generation of Th17 cells has been mainly associated with its role in immunopathology. Here we discuss the view that the immune system in general, and type 17 immunity in particular, develop to maintain the equilibrium of the host with its symbionts.
Citation:
Intestinal microbiota, evolution of the immune system and the bad reputation of pro-inflammatory immunity. 2011, 13 (5):653-9 Cell. Microbiol.
Journal:
Cellular microbiology
Issue Date:
May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/347155
DOI:
10.1111/j.1462-5822.2011.01577.x
PubMed ID:
21338464
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-5822
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of experimental infection research ([TC] EXPI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOhnmacht, Casparen
dc.contributor.authorMarques, Ruteen
dc.contributor.authorPresley, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorSawa, Shinichiroen
dc.contributor.authorLochner, Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorEberl, Gérarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-26T10:38:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-26T10:38:15Zen
dc.date.issued2011-05en
dc.identifier.citationIntestinal microbiota, evolution of the immune system and the bad reputation of pro-inflammatory immunity. 2011, 13 (5):653-9 Cell. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-5822en
dc.identifier.pmid21338464en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1462-5822.2011.01577.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/347155en
dc.description.abstractThe mammalian intestine provides a unique niche for a large community of bacterial symbionts that complements the host in digestive and anabolic pathways, as well as in protection from pathogens. Only a few bacterial phyla have adapted to this predominantly anaerobic environment, but hundreds of different species create an ecosystem that affects many facets of the host's physiology. Recent data show how particular symbionts are involved in the maturation of the immune system, in the intestine and beyond, and how dysbiosis, or alteration of that community, can deregulate immunity and lead to immunopathology. The extensive and dynamic interactions between the symbionts and the immune system are key to homeostasis and health, and require all the blends of so-called regulatory and pro-inflammatory immune reactions. Unfortunately, pro-inflammatory immunity leading to the generation of Th17 cells has been mainly associated with its role in immunopathology. Here we discuss the view that the immune system in general, and type 17 immunity in particular, develop to maintain the equilibrium of the host with its symbionts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshHomeostasisen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Mucosaen
dc.subject.meshSymbiosisen
dc.subject.meshTh17 Cellsen
dc.titleIntestinal microbiota, evolution of the immune system and the bad reputation of pro-inflammatory immunity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCellular microbiologyen

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.