Concise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/550489
Title:
Concise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments.
Authors:
Cantz, Tobias; Sharma, Amar Deep; Ott, Michael
Abstract:
The concept of cell-based therapies for inherited metabolic liver diseases has been introduced for now more than 40 years in animal experiments, but controlled clinical data in humans are still not available. In the era of dynamic developments in stem cell science, the "right" cell for transplantation is considered as an important key for successful treatment. Do we aim to transplant mature hepatocytes or do we consider the liver as a stem/progenitor-driven organ and replenish the diseased liver with genetically normal stem/progenitor cells? Although conflicting results from cell tracing and transplantation experiments have recently emerged about the existence and role of stem/progenitor cells in the liver, their overall contribution to parenchymal cell homeostasis and tissue repair is limited. Accordingly, engraftment and repopulation efficacies of extrahepatic and liver-derived stem/progenitor cell types are considered to be lower compared to mature hepatocytes. On the basis of these results, we will discuss the current clinical cell transplantation programs for inherited metabolic liver diseases and future developments in liver cell therapy. Stem Cells 2015;33:1055-1062.
Affiliation:
TWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625, Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Concise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments. 2015, 33 (4):1055-62 Stem Cells
Journal:
Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio)
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/550489
DOI:
10.1002/stem.1920
PubMed ID:
25524146
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1549-4918
Appears in Collections:
publications of the AG cell and gene therapy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCantz, Tobiasen
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Amar Deepen
dc.contributor.authorOtt, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-23T09:35:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-23T09:35:22Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.identifier.citationConcise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments. 2015, 33 (4):1055-62 Stem Cellsen
dc.identifier.issn1549-4918en
dc.identifier.pmid25524146en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/stem.1920en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/550489en
dc.description.abstractThe concept of cell-based therapies for inherited metabolic liver diseases has been introduced for now more than 40 years in animal experiments, but controlled clinical data in humans are still not available. In the era of dynamic developments in stem cell science, the "right" cell for transplantation is considered as an important key for successful treatment. Do we aim to transplant mature hepatocytes or do we consider the liver as a stem/progenitor-driven organ and replenish the diseased liver with genetically normal stem/progenitor cells? Although conflicting results from cell tracing and transplantation experiments have recently emerged about the existence and role of stem/progenitor cells in the liver, their overall contribution to parenchymal cell homeostasis and tissue repair is limited. Accordingly, engraftment and repopulation efficacies of extrahepatic and liver-derived stem/progenitor cell types are considered to be lower compared to mature hepatocytes. On the basis of these results, we will discuss the current clinical cell transplantation programs for inherited metabolic liver diseases and future developments in liver cell therapy. Stem Cells 2015;33:1055-1062.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleConcise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTWINCORE, Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625, Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalStem cells (Dayton, Ohio)en

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