2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/565774
Title:
Development of a unique epigenetic signature during in vivo Th17 differentiation.
Authors:
Yang, Bi-Huei; Floess, Stefan; Hagemann, Stefanie; Deyneko, Igor V; Groebe, Lothar; Pezoldt, Joern; Sparwasser, Tim ( 0000-0001-5645-902X ) ; Lochner, Matthias; Huehn, Jochen
Abstract:
Activated naive CD4(+) T cells are highly plastic cells that can differentiate into various T helper (Th) cell fates characterized by the expression of effector cytokines like IFN-γ (Th1), IL-4 (Th2) or IL-17A (Th17). Although previous studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms including DNA demethylation can stabilize effector cytokine expression, a comprehensive analysis of the changes in the DNA methylation pattern during differentiation of naive T cells into Th cell subsets is lacking. Hence, we here performed a genome-wide methylome analysis of ex vivo isolated naive CD4(+) T cells, Th1 and Th17 cells. We could demonstrate that naive CD4(+) T cells share more demethylated regions with Th17 cells when compared to Th1 cells, and that overall Th17 cells display the highest number of demethylated regions, findings which are in line with the previously reported plasticity of Th17 cells. We could identify seven regions located in Il17a, Zfp362, Ccr6, Acsbg1, Dpp4, Rora and Dclk1 showing pronounced demethylation selectively in ex vivo isolated Th17 cells when compared to other ex vivo isolated Th cell subsets and in vitro generated Th17 cells, suggesting that this unique epigenetic signature allows identifying and functionally characterizing in vivo generated Th17 cells.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Development of a unique epigenetic signature during in vivo Th17 differentiation. 2015, 43 (3):1537-48 Nucleic Acids Res.
Journal:
Nucleic acids research
Issue Date:
18-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/565774
DOI:
10.1093/nar/gkv014
PubMed ID:
25593324
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1362-4962
Appears in Collections:
publications of the division experimentelle Immunologie (EXIM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYang, Bi-Hueien
dc.contributor.authorFloess, Stefanen
dc.contributor.authorHagemann, Stefanieen
dc.contributor.authorDeyneko, Igor Ven
dc.contributor.authorGroebe, Lotharen
dc.contributor.authorPezoldt, Joernen
dc.contributor.authorSparwasser, Timen
dc.contributor.authorLochner, Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorHuehn, Jochenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-10T09:03:06Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-10T09:03:06Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-18en
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment of a unique epigenetic signature during in vivo Th17 differentiation. 2015, 43 (3):1537-48 Nucleic Acids Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1362-4962en
dc.identifier.pmid25593324en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/nar/gkv014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/565774en
dc.description.abstractActivated naive CD4(+) T cells are highly plastic cells that can differentiate into various T helper (Th) cell fates characterized by the expression of effector cytokines like IFN-γ (Th1), IL-4 (Th2) or IL-17A (Th17). Although previous studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms including DNA demethylation can stabilize effector cytokine expression, a comprehensive analysis of the changes in the DNA methylation pattern during differentiation of naive T cells into Th cell subsets is lacking. Hence, we here performed a genome-wide methylome analysis of ex vivo isolated naive CD4(+) T cells, Th1 and Th17 cells. We could demonstrate that naive CD4(+) T cells share more demethylated regions with Th17 cells when compared to Th1 cells, and that overall Th17 cells display the highest number of demethylated regions, findings which are in line with the previously reported plasticity of Th17 cells. We could identify seven regions located in Il17a, Zfp362, Ccr6, Acsbg1, Dpp4, Rora and Dclk1 showing pronounced demethylation selectively in ex vivo isolated Th17 cells when compared to other ex vivo isolated Th cell subsets and in vitro generated Th17 cells, suggesting that this unique epigenetic signature allows identifying and functionally characterizing in vivo generated Th17 cells.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen
dc.subject.meshDNA Methylationen
dc.subject.meshEpigenesis, Geneticen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred BALB Cen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen
dc.subject.meshOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysisen
dc.subject.meshTh17 Cellsen
dc.titleDevelopment of a unique epigenetic signature during in vivo Th17 differentiation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalNucleic acids researchen

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