Evidence for a causal link between adaptor protein PDZK1 downregulation and Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine colitis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/578701
Title:
Evidence for a causal link between adaptor protein PDZK1 downregulation and Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine colitis.
Authors:
Yeruva, Sunil; Chodisetti, Giriprakash; Luo, Min; Chen, Mingmin; Cinar, Ayhan; Ludolph, Lisa; Lünnemann, Maria; Goldstein, Julia; Singh, Anurag Kumar; Riederer, Brigitte; Bachmann, Oliver; Bleich, Andre; Gereke, Markus; Bruder, Dunja ( 0000-0003-3066-189X ) ; Hagen, Susan; He, Peijian; Yun, Chris; Seidler, Ursula
Abstract:
A dysfunction of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) significantly contributes to the reduced salt absorptive capacity of the inflamed intestine. We previously reported a strong decrease in the NHERF family member PDZK1 (NHERF3), which binds to NHE3 and regulates its function in a mouse model of colitis. The present study investigates whether a causal relationship exists between the decreased PDZK1 expression and the NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine intestinal inflammation. Biopsies from the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis, murine inflamed ileal and colonic mucosa, NHE3-transfected Caco-2BBe colonic cells with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of PDZK1, and Pdzk1-gene-deleted mice were studied. PDZK1 mRNA and protein expression was strongly decreased in inflamed human and murine intestinal tissue as compared to inactive disease or control tissue, whereas that of NHE3 or NHERF1 was not. Inflamed human and murine intestinal tissues displayed correct brush border localization of NHE3 but reduced acid-activated NHE3 transport activity. A similar NHE3 transport defect was observed when PDZK1 protein content was decreased by shRNA knockdown in Caco-2BBe cells or when enterocyte PDZK1 protein content was decreased to similar levels as found in inflamed mucosa by heterozygote breeding of Pdzk1-gene-deleted and WT mice. We conclude that a decrease in PDZK1 expression, whether induced by inflammation, shRNA-mediated knockdown, or heterozygous breeding, is associated with a decreased NHE3 transport rate in human and murine enterocytes. We therefore hypothesize that inflammation-induced loss of PDZK1 expression may contribute to the NHE3 dysfunction observed in the inflamed intestine.
Citation:
Evidence for a causal link between adaptor protein PDZK1 downregulation and Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine colitis. 2015, 467 (8):1795-807 Pflugers Arch.
Journal:
Pflügers Archiv : European journal of physiology
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/578701
DOI:
10.1007/s00424-014-1608-x
PubMed ID:
25271043
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1432-2013
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group immunoregulation (IREG)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYeruva, Sunilen
dc.contributor.authorChodisetti, Giriprakashen
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Minen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Mingminen
dc.contributor.authorCinar, Ayhanen
dc.contributor.authorLudolph, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorLünnemann, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Juliaen
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Anurag Kumaren
dc.contributor.authorRiederer, Brigitteen
dc.contributor.authorBachmann, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorBleich, Andreen
dc.contributor.authorGereke, Markusen
dc.contributor.authorBruder, Dunjaen
dc.contributor.authorHagen, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorHe, Peijianen
dc.contributor.authorYun, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorSeidler, Ursulaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-24T09:22:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-24T09:22:43Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.citationEvidence for a causal link between adaptor protein PDZK1 downregulation and Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine colitis. 2015, 467 (8):1795-807 Pflugers Arch.en
dc.identifier.issn1432-2013en
dc.identifier.pmid25271043en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00424-014-1608-xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/578701en
dc.description.abstractA dysfunction of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) significantly contributes to the reduced salt absorptive capacity of the inflamed intestine. We previously reported a strong decrease in the NHERF family member PDZK1 (NHERF3), which binds to NHE3 and regulates its function in a mouse model of colitis. The present study investigates whether a causal relationship exists between the decreased PDZK1 expression and the NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine intestinal inflammation. Biopsies from the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis, murine inflamed ileal and colonic mucosa, NHE3-transfected Caco-2BBe colonic cells with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of PDZK1, and Pdzk1-gene-deleted mice were studied. PDZK1 mRNA and protein expression was strongly decreased in inflamed human and murine intestinal tissue as compared to inactive disease or control tissue, whereas that of NHE3 or NHERF1 was not. Inflamed human and murine intestinal tissues displayed correct brush border localization of NHE3 but reduced acid-activated NHE3 transport activity. A similar NHE3 transport defect was observed when PDZK1 protein content was decreased by shRNA knockdown in Caco-2BBe cells or when enterocyte PDZK1 protein content was decreased to similar levels as found in inflamed mucosa by heterozygote breeding of Pdzk1-gene-deleted and WT mice. We conclude that a decrease in PDZK1 expression, whether induced by inflammation, shRNA-mediated knockdown, or heterozygous breeding, is associated with a decreased NHE3 transport rate in human and murine enterocytes. We therefore hypothesize that inflammation-induced loss of PDZK1 expression may contribute to the NHE3 dysfunction observed in the inflamed intestine.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleEvidence for a causal link between adaptor protein PDZK1 downregulation and Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger NHE3 dysfunction in human and murine colitis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPflügers Archiv : European journal of physiologyen

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