3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/600850
Title:
Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology.
Authors:
Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Pruzzo, Carla
Abstract:
Vibrio-related infections are increasing worldwide both in humans and aquatic animals. Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases. In this chapter, major known effects of increasing SST on the biology and ecology of vibrios are described. They include the effects on bacterial growth rate, both in the field and in laboratory, culturability, expression of pathogenicity traits, and interactions with aquatic organisms and abiotic surfaces. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ocean warming on Vibrio interactions with zooplankters, which represent one of the most important aquatic reservoirs for these bacteria. The reported findings highlight the biocomplexity of the interactions between vibrios and their natural environment in a climate change scenario, posing the need for interdisciplinary studies to properly understand the connection between ocean warming and persistence and spread of vibrios in sea waters and the epidemiology of the diseases they cause.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology. 2015, 3 (3): Microbiol Spectr
Journal:
Microbiology spectrum
Issue Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/600850
DOI:
10.1128/microbiolspec.VE-0004-2014
PubMed ID:
26185070
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2165-0497
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial diagnosis (MIDI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVezzulli, Luigien
dc.contributor.authorPezzati, Elisabettaen
dc.contributor.authorBrettar, Ingriden
dc.contributor.authorHöfle, Manfreden
dc.contributor.authorPruzzo, Carlaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T10:45:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T10:45:59Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifier.citationEffects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology. 2015, 3 (3): Microbiol Spectren
dc.identifier.issn2165-0497en
dc.identifier.pmid26185070en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/microbiolspec.VE-0004-2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/600850en
dc.description.abstractVibrio-related infections are increasing worldwide both in humans and aquatic animals. Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases. In this chapter, major known effects of increasing SST on the biology and ecology of vibrios are described. They include the effects on bacterial growth rate, both in the field and in laboratory, culturability, expression of pathogenicity traits, and interactions with aquatic organisms and abiotic surfaces. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ocean warming on Vibrio interactions with zooplankters, which represent one of the most important aquatic reservoirs for these bacteria. The reported findings highlight the biocomplexity of the interactions between vibrios and their natural environment in a climate change scenario, posing the need for interdisciplinary studies to properly understand the connection between ocean warming and persistence and spread of vibrios in sea waters and the epidemiology of the diseases they cause.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleEffects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalMicrobiology spectrumen

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