Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances β-amyloid phagocytosis and clearance by recruited monocytes.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/604845
Title:
Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances β-amyloid phagocytosis and clearance by recruited monocytes.
Authors:
Möhle, Luisa; Israel, Nicole; Paarmann, Kristin; Krohn, Markus; Pietkiewicz, Sabine; Müller, Andreas; Lavrik, Inna N; Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Schott, Björn H; Schlüter, Dirk; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Montag, Dirk; Seifert, Ulrike; Pahnke, Jens; Dunay, Ildiko Rita
Abstract:
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain, thus leading to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Plaque formation depends not merely on the amount of generated Aβ peptides, but more importantly on their effective removal. Chronic infections with neurotropic pathogens, most prominently the parasite Toxoplasma (T.) gondii, are frequent in the elderly, and it has been suggested that the resulting neuroinflammation may influence the course of AD. In the present study, we investigated how chronic T. gondii infection and resulting neuroinflammation affect plaque deposition and removal in a mouse model of AD.
Affiliation:
Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, University of Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.
Citation:
Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances β-amyloid phagocytosis and clearance by recruited monocytes. 2016, 4 (1):25 Acta Neuropathol Commun
Journal:
Acta neuropathologica communications
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/604845
DOI:
10.1186/s40478-016-0293-8
PubMed ID:
26984535
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2051-5960
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group intravital microscopy in infection and immunity (INMI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMöhle, Luisaen
dc.contributor.authorIsrael, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorPaarmann, Kristinen
dc.contributor.authorKrohn, Markusen
dc.contributor.authorPietkiewicz, Sabineen
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorLavrik, Inna Nen
dc.contributor.authorBuguliskis, Jeffrey Sen
dc.contributor.authorSchott, Björn Hen
dc.contributor.authorSchlüter, Dirken
dc.contributor.authorGundelfinger, Eckart Den
dc.contributor.authorMontag, Dirken
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Ulrikeen
dc.contributor.authorPahnke, Jensen
dc.contributor.authorDunay, Ildiko Ritaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T13:39:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-08T13:39:17Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationChronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances β-amyloid phagocytosis and clearance by recruited monocytes. 2016, 4 (1):25 Acta Neuropathol Communen
dc.identifier.issn2051-5960en
dc.identifier.pmid26984535en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40478-016-0293-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/604845en
dc.description.abstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain, thus leading to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Plaque formation depends not merely on the amount of generated Aβ peptides, but more importantly on their effective removal. Chronic infections with neurotropic pathogens, most prominently the parasite Toxoplasma (T.) gondii, are frequent in the elderly, and it has been suggested that the resulting neuroinflammation may influence the course of AD. In the present study, we investigated how chronic T. gondii infection and resulting neuroinflammation affect plaque deposition and removal in a mouse model of AD.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleChronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances β-amyloid phagocytosis and clearance by recruited monocytes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, University of Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalActa neuropathologica communicationsen

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