2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/610562
Title:
Biofilm transplantation in the deep sea.
Authors:
Wagner-Döbler, Irene
Abstract:
A gold rush is currently going on in microbial ecology, which is powered by the possibility to determine the full complexity of microbial communities through next-generation sequencing. Accordingly, enormous efforts are underway to describe microbiomes worldwide, in humans, animals, plants, soil, air and the ocean. While much can be learned from these studies, only experiments will finally unravel mechanisms. One of the key questions is how a microbial community is assembled from a pool of bacteria in the environment, and how it responds to change - be it the increase in CO2 concentration in the ocean, or antibiotic treatment of the gut microbiome. The study by Zhang et al. () in this issue is one of the very few that approaches this problem experimentally in the natural environment. The authors selected a habitat which is both extremely interesting and difficult to access. They studied the Thuwal Seep in the Red Sea at 850 m depth and used a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to place a steel frame carrying substrata for biofilm growth into the brine pool and into the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW). Biofilms were allowed to develop for 3 days, and then those that had been growing in the brine pool were transported to normal bottom water and stayed there for another 3 days, and vice versa. The 'switched' biofilms were then compared with their source communities by metagenome sequencing. Strikingly, both 'switched' biofilms were now dominated by the same two species. These species were able to cope with conditions in both source ecosystems, as shown by assembly of their genomes and detection of expression of key genes. The biofilms had adapted to environmental change, rather than to brine pools or NBW. The study shows both the resilience and adaptability of biofilm communities and has implications for microbial ecology in general and even for therapeutic approaches such as transplantation of faecal microbiomes.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Biofilm transplantation in the deep sea. 2016, 25 (9):1905-7 Mol. Ecol.
Journal:
Molecular ecology
Issue Date:
May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/610562
DOI:
10.1111/mec.13612
PubMed ID:
27169388
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1365-294X
Appears in Collections:
collections of the research group microbial communication (KOM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWagner-Döbler, Ireneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-23T12:58:19Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-23T12:58:19Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.citationBiofilm transplantation in the deep sea. 2016, 25 (9):1905-7 Mol. Ecol.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-294Xen
dc.identifier.pmid27169388en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.13612en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/610562en
dc.description.abstractA gold rush is currently going on in microbial ecology, which is powered by the possibility to determine the full complexity of microbial communities through next-generation sequencing. Accordingly, enormous efforts are underway to describe microbiomes worldwide, in humans, animals, plants, soil, air and the ocean. While much can be learned from these studies, only experiments will finally unravel mechanisms. One of the key questions is how a microbial community is assembled from a pool of bacteria in the environment, and how it responds to change - be it the increase in CO2 concentration in the ocean, or antibiotic treatment of the gut microbiome. The study by Zhang et al. () in this issue is one of the very few that approaches this problem experimentally in the natural environment. The authors selected a habitat which is both extremely interesting and difficult to access. They studied the Thuwal Seep in the Red Sea at 850 m depth and used a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to place a steel frame carrying substrata for biofilm growth into the brine pool and into the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW). Biofilms were allowed to develop for 3 days, and then those that had been growing in the brine pool were transported to normal bottom water and stayed there for another 3 days, and vice versa. The 'switched' biofilms were then compared with their source communities by metagenome sequencing. Strikingly, both 'switched' biofilms were now dominated by the same two species. These species were able to cope with conditions in both source ecosystems, as shown by assembly of their genomes and detection of expression of key genes. The biofilms had adapted to environmental change, rather than to brine pools or NBW. The study shows both the resilience and adaptability of biofilm communities and has implications for microbial ecology in general and even for therapeutic approaches such as transplantation of faecal microbiomes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleBiofilm transplantation in the deep sea.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalMolecular ecologyen

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