Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/611982
Title:
Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications.
Authors:
Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank
Abstract:
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic.
Affiliation:
Twincore Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications. 2016, 3:22 Front Vet Sci
Journal:
Frontiers in veterinary science
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/611982
DOI:
10.3389/fvets.2016.00022
PubMed ID:
27092305
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2297-1769
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group biomarker in infection and immunity [[TC] BIOM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSamir, Mohameden
dc.contributor.authorPessler, Franken
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-07T13:09:29Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-07T13:09:29Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationSmall Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications. 2016, 3:22 Front Vet Scien
dc.identifier.issn2297-1769en
dc.identifier.pmid27092305en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fvets.2016.00022en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/611982en
dc.description.abstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleSmall Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTwincore Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in veterinary scienceen

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