Ebola Virus Disease Is Characterized by Poor Activation and Reduced Levels of Circulating CD16+ Monocytes.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620549
Title:
Ebola Virus Disease Is Characterized by Poor Activation and Reduced Levels of Circulating CD16+ Monocytes.
Authors:
Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Rottstegge, Monika; Wozniak, David M; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Thorenz, Anja; Weller, Romy; Kerber, Romy; Idoyaga, Juliana; Magassouba, N'Faly; Gabriel, Martin; Günther, Stephan; Oestereich, Lisa; Muñoz-Fontela, César
Abstract:
A number of previous studies have identified antigen-presenting cells (APCs) as key targets of Ebola virus (EBOV), but the role of APCs in human Ebola virus disease (EVD) is not known. We have evaluated the phenotype and kinetics of monocytes, neutrophils, and dendritic cells (DCs) in peripheral blood of patients for whom EVD was diagnosed by the European Mobile Laboratory in Guinea. Acute EVD was characterized by reduced levels of circulating nonclassical CD16(+) monocytes with a poor activation profile. In survivors, CD16(+) monocytes were activated during recovery, coincident with viral clearance, suggesting an important role of this cell subset in EVD pathophysiology.
Affiliation:
TwinCore, Centre for experimental and clinical infection research GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Ebola Virus Disease Is Characterized by Poor Activation and Reduced Levels of Circulating CD16+ Monocytes. 2016, 214 (suppl 3):S275-S280 J. Infect. Dis.
Journal:
The Journal of infectious diseases
Issue Date:
15-Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620549
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiw260
PubMed ID:
27521367
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1537-6613
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department experimental Virology([TC]EVIR)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLüdtke, Anjaen
dc.contributor.authorRuibal, Paulaen
dc.contributor.authorBecker-Ziaja, Beateen
dc.contributor.authorRottstegge, Monikaen
dc.contributor.authorWozniak, David Men
dc.contributor.authorCabeza-Cabrerizo, Maren
dc.contributor.authorThorenz, Anjaen
dc.contributor.authorWeller, Romyen
dc.contributor.authorKerber, Romyen
dc.contributor.authorIdoyaga, Julianaen
dc.contributor.authorMagassouba, N'Falyen
dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorGünther, Stephanen
dc.contributor.authorOestereich, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz-Fontela, Césaren
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-12T13:56:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-12T13:56:47Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-15-
dc.identifier.citationEbola Virus Disease Is Characterized by Poor Activation and Reduced Levels of Circulating CD16+ Monocytes. 2016, 214 (suppl 3):S275-S280 J. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1537-6613-
dc.identifier.pmid27521367-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiw260-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620549-
dc.description.abstractA number of previous studies have identified antigen-presenting cells (APCs) as key targets of Ebola virus (EBOV), but the role of APCs in human Ebola virus disease (EVD) is not known. We have evaluated the phenotype and kinetics of monocytes, neutrophils, and dendritic cells (DCs) in peripheral blood of patients for whom EVD was diagnosed by the European Mobile Laboratory in Guinea. Acute EVD was characterized by reduced levels of circulating nonclassical CD16(+) monocytes with a poor activation profile. In survivors, CD16(+) monocytes were activated during recovery, coincident with viral clearance, suggesting an important role of this cell subset in EVD pathophysiology.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.relation'info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/'.Example: info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/666100en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleEbola Virus Disease Is Characterized by Poor Activation and Reduced Levels of Circulating CD16+ Monocytes.
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTwinCore, Centre for experimental and clinical infection research GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of infectious diseasesen

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