2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620757
Title:
Packaging protein drugs as bacterial inclusion bodies for therapeutic applications
Authors:
Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena; Rinas, Ursula; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Kosoy, Ana; Corchero, José L; Vazquez, Esther
Abstract:
Abstract A growing number of insights on the biology of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have revealed intriguing utilities of these protein particles. Since they combine mechanical stability and protein functionality, IBs have been already exploited in biocatalysis and explored for bottom-up topographical modification in tissue engineering. Being fully biocompatible and with tuneable bio-physical properties, IBs are currently emerging as agents for protein delivery into mammalian cells in protein-replacement cell therapies. So far, IBs formed by chaperones (heat shock protein 70, Hsp70), enzymes (catalase and dihydrofolate reductase), grow factors (leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF) and structural proteins (the cytoskeleton keratin 14) have been shown to rescue exposed cells from a spectrum of stresses and restore cell functions in absence of cytotoxicity. The natural penetrability of IBs into mammalian cells (reaching both cytoplasm and nucleus) empowers them as an unexpected platform for the controlled delivery of essentially any therapeutic polypeptide. Production of protein drugs by biopharma has been traditionally challenged by IB formation. However, a time might have arrived in which recombinant bacteria are to be engineered for the controlled packaging of therapeutic proteins as nanoparticulate materials (nanopills), for their extra- or intra-cellular release in medicine and cosmetics.
Citation:
Microbial Cell Factories. 2012 Jun 11;11(1):76
Issue Date:
11-Jun-2012
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2859-11-76; http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620757
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group recombinant protein expression (RPEX)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVillaverde, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Fruitós, Elenaen
dc.contributor.authorRinas, Ursulaen
dc.contributor.authorSeras-Franzoso, Joaquinen
dc.contributor.authorKosoy, Anaen
dc.contributor.authorCorchero, José Len
dc.contributor.authorVazquez, Estheren
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-27T08:36:00Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-27T08:36:00Z-
dc.date.issued2012-06-11en
dc.identifier.citationMicrobial Cell Factories. 2012 Jun 11;11(1):76en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2859-11-76en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620757-
dc.description.abstractAbstract A growing number of insights on the biology of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have revealed intriguing utilities of these protein particles. Since they combine mechanical stability and protein functionality, IBs have been already exploited in biocatalysis and explored for bottom-up topographical modification in tissue engineering. Being fully biocompatible and with tuneable bio-physical properties, IBs are currently emerging as agents for protein delivery into mammalian cells in protein-replacement cell therapies. So far, IBs formed by chaperones (heat shock protein 70, Hsp70), enzymes (catalase and dihydrofolate reductase), grow factors (leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF) and structural proteins (the cytoskeleton keratin 14) have been shown to rescue exposed cells from a spectrum of stresses and restore cell functions in absence of cytotoxicity. The natural penetrability of IBs into mammalian cells (reaching both cytoplasm and nucleus) empowers them as an unexpected platform for the controlled delivery of essentially any therapeutic polypeptide. Production of protein drugs by biopharma has been traditionally challenged by IB formation. However, a time might have arrived in which recombinant bacteria are to be engineered for the controlled packaging of therapeutic proteins as nanoparticulate materials (nanopills), for their extra- or intra-cellular release in medicine and cosmetics.en
dc.titlePackaging protein drugs as bacterial inclusion bodies for therapeutic applicationsen
dc.language.rfc3066enen
dc.rights.holderVillaverde et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.date.updated2015-09-04T08:29:13Zen
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.