Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620905
Title:
Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon.
Authors:
Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias
Abstract:
The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer's patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation.
Affiliation:
Twincore, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon. 2016, 7:342 Front Immunol
Journal:
Frontiers in immunology
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620905
DOI:
10.3389/fimmu.2016.00342
PubMed ID:
27656182
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
publications of the TwinCore unit Infection immunology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBuettner, Manuelaen
dc.contributor.authorLochner, Matthiasen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:54:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:54:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationDevelopment and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon. 2016, 7:342 Front Immunolen
dc.identifier.pmid27656182-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fimmu.2016.00342-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620905-
dc.description.abstractThe immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer's patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleDevelopment and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTwincore, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in immunologyen

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