2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620918
Title:
Extracellular vesicles - A promising avenue for the detection and treatment of infectious diseases?
Authors:
Fuhrmann, Gregor ( 0000-0002-6688-5126 ) ; Neuer, Anna Lena; Herrmann, Inge K
Abstract:
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have gained increasing attention as novel disease biomarkers and as promising therapeutic agents. These cell-derived, phospholipid-based particles are present in many - if not all - physiological fluids. They have been shown to govern several physiological processes, such as cell-cell communication, but also to be involved in pathological conditions, for example tumour progression. In infectious diseases, EVs have been shown to induce host immune responses and to mediate transfer of virulence or resistance factors. Here, we discuss recent developments in using EVs as diagnostic tools for infectious diseases, the development of EV-based vaccines and the use of EVs as potential anti-infective entity. We illustrate how EV-based strategies could open a viable new avenue to tackle current challenges in the field of infections, including barrier penetration and growing resistance to antimicrobials.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.
Citation:
Extracellular vesicles - A promising avenue for the detection and treatment of infectious diseases? 2017 Eur J Pharm Biopharm
Journal:
European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.V
Issue Date:
7-Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620918
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpb.2017.04.005
PubMed ID:
28396279
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1873-3441
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group biogenic nanotherapeutics ([HIPS] BION)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFuhrmann, Gregoren
dc.contributor.authorNeuer, Anna Lenaen
dc.contributor.authorHerrmann, Inge Ken
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T11:07:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-16T11:07:12Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-07-
dc.identifier.citationExtracellular vesicles - A promising avenue for the detection and treatment of infectious diseases? 2017 Eur J Pharm Biopharmen
dc.identifier.issn1873-3441-
dc.identifier.pmid28396279-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejpb.2017.04.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620918-
dc.description.abstractExtracellular vesicles (EVs) have gained increasing attention as novel disease biomarkers and as promising therapeutic agents. These cell-derived, phospholipid-based particles are present in many - if not all - physiological fluids. They have been shown to govern several physiological processes, such as cell-cell communication, but also to be involved in pathological conditions, for example tumour progression. In infectious diseases, EVs have been shown to induce host immune responses and to mediate transfer of virulence or resistance factors. Here, we discuss recent developments in using EVs as diagnostic tools for infectious diseases, the development of EV-based vaccines and the use of EVs as potential anti-infective entity. We illustrate how EV-based strategies could open a viable new avenue to tackle current challenges in the field of infections, including barrier penetration and growing resistance to antimicrobials.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleExtracellular vesicles - A promising avenue for the detection and treatment of infectious diseases?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.Ven

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