Validation of HAV biomarker 2A for differential diagnostic of hepatitis A infected and vaccinated individuals using multiplex serology.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621133
Title:
Validation of HAV biomarker 2A for differential diagnostic of hepatitis A infected and vaccinated individuals using multiplex serology.
Authors:
Bohm, Katrin; Filomena, Angela; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Krause, Gerard ( 0000-0003-3328-8808 ) ; Sievers, Claudia
Abstract:
Worldwide about 1.5 million clinical cases of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections occur every year and increasingly countries are introducing HAV vaccination into the childhood immunization schedule with a single dose instead of the originally licenced two dose regimen. Diagnosis of acute HAV infection is determined serologically by anti-HAV-IgM detection using ELISA. Additionally anti-HAV-IgG can become positive during the early phase of symptoms, but remains detectable after infection and also after vaccination against HAV. Currently no serological marker allows the differentiation of HAV vaccinated individuals and those with a past infection with HAV. Such differentiation would greatly improve evaluation of vaccination campaigns and risk assessment of HAV outbreaks. Here we tested the HAV non-structural protein 2A, important for the capsid assembly, as a biomarker for the differentiation of the immune status in previously infected and vaccinated individuals.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Validation of HAV biomarker 2A for differential diagnostic of hepatitis A infected and vaccinated individuals using multiplex serology. 2017, 35 (43):5883-5889 Vaccine
Journal:
Vaccine
Issue Date:
13-Oct-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621133
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.08.089
PubMed ID:
28919226
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1873-2518
Appears in Collections:
Publications of the department of epidemiology (EPID)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBohm, Katrinen
dc.contributor.authorFilomena, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorSchneiderhan-Marra, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Gerarden
dc.contributor.authorSievers, Claudiaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-10T13:58:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-10T13:58:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-13-
dc.identifier.citationValidation of HAV biomarker 2A for differential diagnostic of hepatitis A infected and vaccinated individuals using multiplex serology. 2017, 35 (43):5883-5889 Vaccineen
dc.identifier.issn1873-2518-
dc.identifier.pmid28919226-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.08.089-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621133-
dc.description.abstractWorldwide about 1.5 million clinical cases of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections occur every year and increasingly countries are introducing HAV vaccination into the childhood immunization schedule with a single dose instead of the originally licenced two dose regimen. Diagnosis of acute HAV infection is determined serologically by anti-HAV-IgM detection using ELISA. Additionally anti-HAV-IgG can become positive during the early phase of symptoms, but remains detectable after infection and also after vaccination against HAV. Currently no serological marker allows the differentiation of HAV vaccinated individuals and those with a past infection with HAV. Such differentiation would greatly improve evaluation of vaccination campaigns and risk assessment of HAV outbreaks. Here we tested the HAV non-structural protein 2A, important for the capsid assembly, as a biomarker for the differentiation of the immune status in previously infected and vaccinated individuals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleValidation of HAV biomarker 2A for differential diagnostic of hepatitis A infected and vaccinated individuals using multiplex serology.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalVaccineen

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