The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1.

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/95975
Title:
The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1.
Authors:
Ukena, Sya N; Westendorf, Astrid M; Hansen, Wiebke; Rohde, Manfred; Geffers, Robert; Coldewey, Sina; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Buer, Jan; Gunzer, Florian
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The use of live microorganisms to influence positively the course of intestinal disorders such as infectious diarrhea or chronic inflammatory conditions has recently gained increasing interest as a therapeutic alternative. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated that probiotic-host eukaryotic cell interactions evoke a large number of responses potentially responsible for the effects of probiotics. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the E. coli Nissle 1917-host interaction by analyzing the gene expression pattern initiated by this probiotic in human intestinal epithelial cells. METHODS: Gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells treated with E. coli Nissle 1917 were analyzed with microarrays. A second human intestinal cell line and also pieces of small intestine from BALB/c mice were used to confirm regulatory data of selected genes by real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array (CBA) to detect secretion of corresponding proteins. RESULTS: Whole genome expression analysis revealed 126 genes specifically regulated after treatment of confluent Caco-2 cells with E. coli Nissle 1917. Among others, expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 ligand 2 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 alpha (MIP-2alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 beta (MIP-2beta) was increased up to 10 fold. Caco-2 cells cocultured with E. coli Nissle 1917 also secreted high amounts of MCP-1 protein. Elevated levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2alpha mRNA could be confirmed with Lovo cells. MCP-1 gene expression was also up-regulated in mouse intestinal tissue. CONCLUSION: Thus, probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 specifically upregulates expression of proinflammatory genes and proteins in human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells.
Affiliation:
German Research Centre for Biotechnology, Mucosal Immunity Group, Mascheroder Weg 1, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. suk@gbf.de
Citation:
The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1. 2005, 6:43 BMC Med. Genet.
Journal:
BMC medical genetics
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/95975
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2350-6-43
PubMed ID:
16351713
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1471-2350
Appears in Collections:
Publications of RG Mucosal Immunity (MI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorUkena, Sya Nen
dc.contributor.authorWestendorf, Astrid Men
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Wiebkeen
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Manfreden
dc.contributor.authorGeffers, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorColdewey, Sinaen
dc.contributor.authorSuerbaum, Sebastianen
dc.contributor.authorBuer, Janen
dc.contributor.authorGunzer, Florianen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-08T09:10:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-08T09:10:02Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationThe host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1. 2005, 6:43 BMC Med. Genet.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2350-
dc.identifier.pmid16351713-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2350-6-43-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/95975-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The use of live microorganisms to influence positively the course of intestinal disorders such as infectious diarrhea or chronic inflammatory conditions has recently gained increasing interest as a therapeutic alternative. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated that probiotic-host eukaryotic cell interactions evoke a large number of responses potentially responsible for the effects of probiotics. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the E. coli Nissle 1917-host interaction by analyzing the gene expression pattern initiated by this probiotic in human intestinal epithelial cells. METHODS: Gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells treated with E. coli Nissle 1917 were analyzed with microarrays. A second human intestinal cell line and also pieces of small intestine from BALB/c mice were used to confirm regulatory data of selected genes by real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array (CBA) to detect secretion of corresponding proteins. RESULTS: Whole genome expression analysis revealed 126 genes specifically regulated after treatment of confluent Caco-2 cells with E. coli Nissle 1917. Among others, expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 ligand 2 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 alpha (MIP-2alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 beta (MIP-2beta) was increased up to 10 fold. Caco-2 cells cocultured with E. coli Nissle 1917 also secreted high amounts of MCP-1 protein. Elevated levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2alpha mRNA could be confirmed with Lovo cells. MCP-1 gene expression was also up-regulated in mouse intestinal tissue. CONCLUSION: Thus, probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 specifically upregulates expression of proinflammatory genes and proteins in human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBiological Therapyen
dc.subject.meshCaco-2 Cellsen
dc.subject.meshChemokine CCL2en
dc.subject.meshChemokine CXCL2en
dc.subject.meshEscherichia colien
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profilingen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapyen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshIntestinesen
dc.subject.meshMonokinesen
dc.subject.meshProbioticsen
dc.subject.meshRNA, Messengeren
dc.subject.meshUp-Regulationen
dc.titleThe host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGerman Research Centre for Biotechnology, Mucosal Immunity Group, Mascheroder Weg 1, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. suk@gbf.deen
dc.identifier.journalBMC medical geneticsen

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