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dc.contributor.authorJaafoura, Sen
dc.contributor.authorde Goër de Herve, M Gen
dc.contributor.authorHernandez-Vargas, E Aen
dc.contributor.authorHendel-Chavez, Hen
dc.contributor.authorAbdoh, Men
dc.contributor.authorMateo, M Cen
dc.contributor.authorKrzysiek, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMerad, Men
dc.contributor.authorSeng, Ren
dc.contributor.authorTardieu, Men
dc.contributor.authorDelfraissy, J Fen
dc.contributor.authorGoujard, Cen
dc.contributor.authorTaoufik, Yen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T09:45:52Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T09:45:52Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationProgressive contraction of the latent HIV reservoir around a core of less-differentiated CD4⁺ memory T Cells. 2014, 5:5407 Nat Communen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.pmid25382623en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms6407en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/600844en
dc.description.abstractIn patients who are receiving prolonged antiretroviral treatment (ART), HIV can persist within a small pool of long-lived resting memory CD4(+) T cells infected with integrated latent virus. This latent reservoir involves distinct memory subsets. Here we provide results that suggest a progressive reduction of the size of the blood latent reservoir around a core of less-differentiated memory subsets (central memory and stem cell-like memory (TSCM) CD4(+) T cells). This process appears to be driven by the differences in initial sizes and decay rates between latently infected memory subsets. Our results also suggest an extreme stability of the TSCM sub-reservoir, the size of which is directly related to cumulative plasma virus exposure before the onset of ART, stressing the importance of early initiation of effective ART. The presence of these intrinsic dynamics within the latent reservoir may have implications for the design of optimal HIV therapeutic purging strategies.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Retroviral Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCD4-Positive T-Lymphocytesen
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirsen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHIV-1en
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocyte Subsetsen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshViral Loaden
dc.subject.meshVirus Latencyen
dc.titleProgressive contraction of the latent HIV reservoir around a core of less-differentiated CD4⁺ memory T Cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalNature communicationsen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T20:04:26Z
html.description.abstractIn patients who are receiving prolonged antiretroviral treatment (ART), HIV can persist within a small pool of long-lived resting memory CD4(+) T cells infected with integrated latent virus. This latent reservoir involves distinct memory subsets. Here we provide results that suggest a progressive reduction of the size of the blood latent reservoir around a core of less-differentiated memory subsets (central memory and stem cell-like memory (TSCM) CD4(+) T cells). This process appears to be driven by the differences in initial sizes and decay rates between latently infected memory subsets. Our results also suggest an extreme stability of the TSCM sub-reservoir, the size of which is directly related to cumulative plasma virus exposure before the onset of ART, stressing the importance of early initiation of effective ART. The presence of these intrinsic dynamics within the latent reservoir may have implications for the design of optimal HIV therapeutic purging strategies.


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