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dc.contributor.authorChen, Jian-Huaen
dc.contributor.authorKellner, Yvesen
dc.contributor.authorZagrebelsky, Martaen
dc.contributor.authorGrunwald, Matthiasen
dc.contributor.authorKorte, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorWalla, Peter Jomoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-07T08:37:07Z
dc.date.available2016-07-07T08:37:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationTwo-Photon Correlation Spectroscopy in Single Dendritic Spines Reveals Fast Actin Filament Reorganization during Activity-Dependent Growth. 2015, 10 (5):e0128241 PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid26020927
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0128241
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/615651
dc.description.abstractTwo-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2P-FCS) within single dendritic spines of living hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to resolve various subpopulations of mobile F-actin during activity-dependent structural changes such as potentiation induced spine head growth. Two major classes of mobile F-actin were discovered: very dynamic and about a hundred times less dynamic F-actin. Spine head enlargement upon application of Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a protocol previously used for the chemical induction of long-term potentiation (cLTP) strictly correlated to changes in the dynamics and filament numbers in the different actin filament fractions. Our observations suggest that spine enlargement is governed by a mechanism in which longer filaments are first cut into smaller filaments that cooperate with the second, increasingly dynamic shorter actin filament population to quickly reorganize and expand the actin cytoskeleton within the spine head. This process would allow a fast and efficient spine head enlargement using a major fraction of the actin filament population that was already present before spine head growth.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshActin Cytoskeletonen
dc.subject.meshActinsen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshCA3 Region, Hippocampalen
dc.subject.meshDendritic Spinesen
dc.subject.meshGene Expressionen
dc.subject.meshLong-Term Potentiationen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen
dc.subject.meshPrimary Cell Cultureen
dc.subject.meshSpectrometry, Fluorescenceen
dc.subject.meshTetraethylammoniumen
dc.titleTwo-Photon Correlation Spectroscopy in Single Dendritic Spines Reveals Fast Actin Filament Reorganization during Activity-Dependent Growth.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T19:59:52Z
html.description.abstractTwo-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2P-FCS) within single dendritic spines of living hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to resolve various subpopulations of mobile F-actin during activity-dependent structural changes such as potentiation induced spine head growth. Two major classes of mobile F-actin were discovered: very dynamic and about a hundred times less dynamic F-actin. Spine head enlargement upon application of Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a protocol previously used for the chemical induction of long-term potentiation (cLTP) strictly correlated to changes in the dynamics and filament numbers in the different actin filament fractions. Our observations suggest that spine enlargement is governed by a mechanism in which longer filaments are first cut into smaller filaments that cooperate with the second, increasingly dynamic shorter actin filament population to quickly reorganize and expand the actin cytoskeleton within the spine head. This process would allow a fast and efficient spine head enlargement using a major fraction of the actin filament population that was already present before spine head growth.


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