• Generation of novel-substrate-accepting biphenyl dioxygenases through segmental random mutagenesis and identification of residues involved in enzyme specificity.

      Zielinski, Marco; Kahl, Silke; Standfuss-Gabisch, Christine; Cámara, Beatriz; Seeger, Michael; Hofer, Bernd; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2006-03)
      Aryl-hydroxylating dioxygenases are of interest for the degradation of persistant aromatic pollutants, such as polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), or as catalysts for the functionalization of aromatic scaffolds. In order to achieve dioxygenation of technical mixtures of PCBs, enzymes with broadened or altered substrate ranges are essential. To alter the substrate specificity of the biphenyl dioxygenase (BphA) of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, we applied a directed evolution approach that used structure-function relationship data to target random mutageneses to specific segments of the enzyme. The limitation of random amino acid (AA) substitutions to regions that are critical for substrate binding and the exclusion of AA exchanges from positions that are essential for catalytic activity yielded enzyme variants of interest at comparatively high frequencies. After only a single mutagenic cycle, 10 beneficial variants were detected in a library of fewer than 1,000 active enzymes. Compared to the parental BphA, they showed between 5- and 200-fold increased turnover of chlorinated biphenyls, with substituent patterns that rendered them largely recalcitrant to attack by BphA-LB400. Determination of their sequences identified AAs that prevent the acceptance of specific PCBs by the wild-type enzyme, such as Pro334 and Phe384. The results suggest prime targets for subsequent cycles of BphA modification. Correlations with a three-dimensional model of the enzyme indicated that most of the exchanges with major influence on substrate turnover do not involve pocket-lining residues and had not been predictable through structural modeling.
    • Identification of high-affinity PB1-derived peptides with enhanced affinity to the PA protein of influenza A virus polymerase.

      Wunderlich, Kerstin; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Ranadheera, Charlene; Kessler, Ulrich; Martin, Arnold; Eisel, Jessica; Beutling, Ulrike; Frank, Ronald; Schwemmle, Martin; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2011-02)
      The influenza A virus polymerase complex, consisting of the subunits PB1, PB2, and PA, represents a promising target for the development of new antiviral drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between PA and PB1 using peptides derived from the extreme N terminus of PB1 (amino acids [aa] 1 to 15), comprising the PA-binding domain of PB1. To increase the binding affinity of these peptides, we performed a systematic structure-affinity relationship analysis. Alanine and aspartic acid scans revealed that almost all amino acids in the core binding region (aa 5 to 11) are indispensable for PA binding. Using a library of immobilized peptides representing all possible single amino acid substitutions, we were able to identify amino acid positions outside the core PA-binding region (aa 1, 3, 12, 14, and 15) that are variable and can be replaced by affinity-enhancing residues. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies revealed that combination of several affinity-enhancing mutations led to an additive effect. Thus, the feasibility to enhance the PA-binding affinity presents an intriguing possibility to increase antiviral activity of the PB1-derived peptide and one step forward in the development of an antiviral drug against influenza A viruses.