2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/322931
Title:
Factors that cause trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.
Authors:
Bergmann, René; van der Linden, Mark; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric
Abstract:
The use of trimethoprim in treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes infections has long been discouraged because it has been widely believed that this pathogen is resistant to this antibiotic. To gain more insight into the extent and molecular basis of trimethoprim resistance in S. pyogenes, we tested isolates from India and Germany and sought the factors that conferred the resistance. Resistant isolates were identified in tests for trimethoprim or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) susceptibility. Resistant isolates were screened for the known horizontally transferable trimethoprim-insensitive dihydrofolate reductase (dfr) genes dfrG, dfrF, dfrA, dfrD, and dfrK. The nucleotide sequence of the intrinsic dfr gene was determined for resistant isolates lacking the horizontally transferable genes. Based on tentative criteria, 69 out of 268 isolates (25.7%) from India were resistant to trimethoprim. Occurring in 42 of the 69 resistant isolates (60.9%), dfrF appeared more frequently than dfrG (23 isolates; 33.3%) in India. The dfrF gene was also present in a collection of SXT-resistant isolates from Germany, in which it was the only detected trimethoprim resistance factor. The dfrF gene caused resistance in 4 out of 5 trimethoprim-resistant isolates from the German collection. An amino acid substitution in the intrinsic dihydrofolate reductase known from trimethoprim-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae conferred resistance to S. pyogenes isolates of emm type 102.2, which lacked other aforementioned dfr genes. Trimethoprim may be more useful in treatment of S. pyogenes infections than previously thought. However, the factors described herein may lead to the rapid development and spread of resistance of S. pyogenes to this antibiotic agent.
Citation:
Factors that cause trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes. 2014, 58 (4):2281-8 Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
Journal:
Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/322931
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.02282-13
PubMed ID:
24492367
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1098-6596
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBergmann, Renéen
dc.contributor.authorvan der Linden, Marken
dc.contributor.authorChhatwal, Gursharan Sen
dc.contributor.authorNitsche-Schmitz, D Patricen
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-15T13:59:12Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-15T13:59:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.identifier.citationFactors that cause trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes. 2014, 58 (4):2281-8 Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.en
dc.identifier.issn1098-6596-
dc.identifier.pmid24492367-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AAC.02282-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/322931-
dc.description.abstractThe use of trimethoprim in treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes infections has long been discouraged because it has been widely believed that this pathogen is resistant to this antibiotic. To gain more insight into the extent and molecular basis of trimethoprim resistance in S. pyogenes, we tested isolates from India and Germany and sought the factors that conferred the resistance. Resistant isolates were identified in tests for trimethoprim or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) susceptibility. Resistant isolates were screened for the known horizontally transferable trimethoprim-insensitive dihydrofolate reductase (dfr) genes dfrG, dfrF, dfrA, dfrD, and dfrK. The nucleotide sequence of the intrinsic dfr gene was determined for resistant isolates lacking the horizontally transferable genes. Based on tentative criteria, 69 out of 268 isolates (25.7%) from India were resistant to trimethoprim. Occurring in 42 of the 69 resistant isolates (60.9%), dfrF appeared more frequently than dfrG (23 isolates; 33.3%) in India. The dfrF gene was also present in a collection of SXT-resistant isolates from Germany, in which it was the only detected trimethoprim resistance factor. The dfrF gene caused resistance in 4 out of 5 trimethoprim-resistant isolates from the German collection. An amino acid substitution in the intrinsic dihydrofolate reductase known from trimethoprim-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae conferred resistance to S. pyogenes isolates of emm type 102.2, which lacked other aforementioned dfr genes. Trimethoprim may be more useful in treatment of S. pyogenes infections than previously thought. However, the factors described herein may lead to the rapid development and spread of resistance of S. pyogenes to this antibiotic agent.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapyen
dc.titleFactors that cause trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapyen

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