Biosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/334911
Title:
Biosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters.
Authors:
Kolinko, Isabel; Lohße, Anna; Borg, Sarah; Raschdorf, Oliver; Jogler, Christian; Tu, Qiang; Pósfai, Mihály; Tompa, Eva; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Brachmann, Andreas; Wanner, Gerhard; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming; Schüler, Dirk
Abstract:
The synthetic production of monodisperse single magnetic domain nanoparticles at ambient temperature is challenging. In nature, magnetosomes--membrane-bound magnetic nanocrystals with unprecedented magnetic properties--can be biomineralized by magnetotactic bacteria. However, these microbes are difficult to handle. Expression of the underlying biosynthetic pathway from these fastidious microorganisms within other organisms could therefore greatly expand their nanotechnological and biomedical applications. So far, this has been hindered by the structural and genetic complexity of the magnetosome organelle and insufficient knowledge of the biosynthetic functions involved. Here, we show that the ability to biomineralize highly ordered magnetic nanostructures can be transferred to a foreign recipient. Expression of a minimal set of genes from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense resulted in magnetosome biosynthesis within the photosynthetic model organism Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our findings will enable the sustainable production of tailored magnetic nanostructures in biotechnologically relevant hosts and represent a step towards the endogenous magnetization of various organisms by synthetic biology.
Affiliation:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Biology I, Großhaderner Straße 2-4, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.
Citation:
Biosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters. 2014, 9 (3):193-7 Nat Nanotechnol
Journal:
Nature nanotechnology
Issue Date:
Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/334911
DOI:
10.1038/nnano.2014.13
PubMed ID:
24561353
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1748-3395
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of microbial natural substances ([HIPS]MINS)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKolinko, Isabelen
dc.contributor.authorLohße, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorBorg, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorRaschdorf, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorJogler, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorTu, Qiangen
dc.contributor.authorPósfai, Mihályen
dc.contributor.authorTompa, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorPlitzko, Jürgen Men
dc.contributor.authorBrachmann, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorWanner, Gerharden
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Rolfen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Youmingen
dc.contributor.authorSchüler, Dirken
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-14T14:02:12Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-14T14:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-
dc.identifier.citationBiosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters. 2014, 9 (3):193-7 Nat Nanotechnolen
dc.identifier.issn1748-3395-
dc.identifier.pmid24561353-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nnano.2014.13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/334911-
dc.description.abstractThe synthetic production of monodisperse single magnetic domain nanoparticles at ambient temperature is challenging. In nature, magnetosomes--membrane-bound magnetic nanocrystals with unprecedented magnetic properties--can be biomineralized by magnetotactic bacteria. However, these microbes are difficult to handle. Expression of the underlying biosynthetic pathway from these fastidious microorganisms within other organisms could therefore greatly expand their nanotechnological and biomedical applications. So far, this has been hindered by the structural and genetic complexity of the magnetosome organelle and insufficient knowledge of the biosynthetic functions involved. Here, we show that the ability to biomineralize highly ordered magnetic nanostructures can be transferred to a foreign recipient. Expression of a minimal set of genes from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense resulted in magnetosome biosynthesis within the photosynthetic model organism Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our findings will enable the sustainable production of tailored magnetic nanostructures in biotechnologically relevant hosts and represent a step towards the endogenous magnetization of various organisms by synthetic biology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBiotechnologyen
dc.subject.meshGene Transfer Techniquesen
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshMagnetosomesen
dc.subject.meshMagnetospirillumen
dc.subject.meshMultigene Familyen
dc.subject.meshNanostructuresen
dc.subject.meshNanotechnologyen
dc.subject.meshRhodospirillum rubrumen
dc.titleBiosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Biology I, Großhaderner Straße 2-4, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalNature nanotechnologyen

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