Phenotypic plasticity in a willow leaf beetle depends on host plant species: release and recognition of beetle odors.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346465
Title:
Phenotypic plasticity in a willow leaf beetle depends on host plant species: release and recognition of beetle odors.
Authors:
Austel, Nadine; Reinecke, Andreas; Björkman, Christer; Hilker, Monika; Meiners, Torsten
Abstract:
Aggregation behavior of herbivorous insects is mediated by a wide range of biotic and abiotic factors. It has been suggested that aggregation behavior of the blue willow leaf beetle Phratora vulgatissima is mediated by both host plant odor and by odor released by the beetles. Previous studies show that the beetles respond to plant odors according to their prior host plant experiences. Here, we analyzed the effect of the host plant species on odor released and perceived by adult P. vulgatissima. The major difference between the odor of beetles feeding on salicin-rich and salicin-poor host plants was the presence of salicylaldehyde in the odor of the former, where both males and females released this compound. Electrophysiological studies showed that the intensity of responses to single components of odor released by beetles was sex specific and dependent on the host plant species with which the beetles were fed. Finally, behavioral studies revealed that males feeding on salicin-rich willows were attracted by salicylaldehyde, whereas females did not respond behaviorally to this compound, despite showing clear antennal responses to it. Finally, the ecological relevance of the influence of a host plant species on the plasticity of beetle odor chemistry, perception, and behavior is discussed.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz-Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffen-Str. 7, Department of Chemical Biology, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Phenotypic plasticity in a willow leaf beetle depends on host plant species: release and recognition of beetle odors. 2015, 40 (2):109-24 Chem. Senses
Journal:
Chemical senses
Issue Date:
Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346465
DOI:
10.1093/chemse/bju065
PubMed ID:
25537016
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1464-3553
Appears in Collections:
Publications of the research group Chemical Biology (CBIO)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAustel, Nadineen
dc.contributor.authorReinecke, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorBjörkman, Christeren
dc.contributor.authorHilker, Monikaen
dc.contributor.authorMeiners, Torstenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T12:49:06Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-10T12:49:06Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02en
dc.identifier.citationPhenotypic plasticity in a willow leaf beetle depends on host plant species: release and recognition of beetle odors. 2015, 40 (2):109-24 Chem. Sensesen
dc.identifier.issn1464-3553en
dc.identifier.pmid25537016en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/chemse/bju065en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/346465en
dc.description.abstractAggregation behavior of herbivorous insects is mediated by a wide range of biotic and abiotic factors. It has been suggested that aggregation behavior of the blue willow leaf beetle Phratora vulgatissima is mediated by both host plant odor and by odor released by the beetles. Previous studies show that the beetles respond to plant odors according to their prior host plant experiences. Here, we analyzed the effect of the host plant species on odor released and perceived by adult P. vulgatissima. The major difference between the odor of beetles feeding on salicin-rich and salicin-poor host plants was the presence of salicylaldehyde in the odor of the former, where both males and females released this compound. Electrophysiological studies showed that the intensity of responses to single components of odor released by beetles was sex specific and dependent on the host plant species with which the beetles were fed. Finally, behavioral studies revealed that males feeding on salicin-rich willows were attracted by salicylaldehyde, whereas females did not respond behaviorally to this compound, despite showing clear antennal responses to it. Finally, the ecological relevance of the influence of a host plant species on the plasticity of beetle odor chemistry, perception, and behavior is discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titlePhenotypic plasticity in a willow leaf beetle depends on host plant species: release and recognition of beetle odors.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz-Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffen-Str. 7, Department of Chemical Biology, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalChemical sensesen
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