Persistence of Toxoplasma gondii in the central nervous system: a fine-tuned balance between the parasite, the brain and the immune system.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346515
Title:
Persistence of Toxoplasma gondii in the central nervous system: a fine-tuned balance between the parasite, the brain and the immune system.
Authors:
Blanchard, N; Dunay, I R; Schlüter, D
Abstract:
Upon infection of humans and animals with Toxoplasma gondii, the parasites persist as intraneuronal cysts that are controlled, but not eliminated by the immune system. In particular, intracerebral T cells are crucial in the control of T. gondii infection and are supported by essential functions from other leukocyte populations. Additionally, brain-resident cells including astrocytes, microglia and neurons contribute to the intracerebral immune response by the production of cytokines, chemokines and expression of immunoregulatory cell surface molecules, such as major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens. However, the in vivo behaviour of these individual cell populations, specifically their interaction during cerebral toxoplasmosis, remains to be elucidated. We discuss here what is known about the function of T cells, recruited myeloid cells and brain-resident cells, with particular emphasis on the potential cross-regulation of these cell populations, in governing cerebral toxoplasmosis.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Persistence of Toxoplasma gondii in the central nervous system: a fine-tuned balance between the parasite, the brain and the immune system. 2015, 37 (3):150-8 Parasite Immunol.
Journal:
Parasite immunology
Issue Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346515
DOI:
10.1111/pim.12173
PubMed ID:
25573476
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1365-3024
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of molecular Infectionbiology (MIBI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBlanchard, Nen
dc.contributor.authorDunay, I Ren
dc.contributor.authorSchlüter, Den
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-11T09:15:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-11T09:15:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.citationPersistence of Toxoplasma gondii in the central nervous system: a fine-tuned balance between the parasite, the brain and the immune system. 2015, 37 (3):150-8 Parasite Immunol.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-3024en
dc.identifier.pmid25573476en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pim.12173en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/346515en
dc.description.abstractUpon infection of humans and animals with Toxoplasma gondii, the parasites persist as intraneuronal cysts that are controlled, but not eliminated by the immune system. In particular, intracerebral T cells are crucial in the control of T. gondii infection and are supported by essential functions from other leukocyte populations. Additionally, brain-resident cells including astrocytes, microglia and neurons contribute to the intracerebral immune response by the production of cytokines, chemokines and expression of immunoregulatory cell surface molecules, such as major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens. However, the in vivo behaviour of these individual cell populations, specifically their interaction during cerebral toxoplasmosis, remains to be elucidated. We discuss here what is known about the function of T cells, recruited myeloid cells and brain-resident cells, with particular emphasis on the potential cross-regulation of these cell populations, in governing cerebral toxoplasmosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titlePersistence of Toxoplasma gondii in the central nervous system: a fine-tuned balance between the parasite, the brain and the immune system.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalParasite immunologyen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.