2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346575
Title:
Toxoplasma gondii-induced neuronal alterations.
Authors:
Parlog, A; Schlüter, D; Dunay, I R
Abstract:
The zoonotic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii infects over 30% of the human population. The intracellular parasite can persist lifelong in the CNS within neurons modifying their function and structure, thus leading to specific behavioural changes of the host. In recent years, several in vitro studies and murine models have focused on the elucidation of these modifications. Furthermore, investigations of the human population have correlated Toxoplasma seropositivity with changes in neurological functions; however, the complex underlying mechanisms of the subtle behavioural alteration are still not fully understood. The parasites are able to induce direct modifications in the infected cells, for example by altering dopamine metabolism, by functionally silencing neurons as well as by hindering apoptosis. Moreover, indirect effects of the peripheral immune system and alterations of the immune status of the CNS, observed during chronic infection, might also contribute to changes in neuronal connectivity and synaptic plasticity. In this review, we will provide an overview and highlight recent advances, which describe changes in the neuronal function and morphology upon T. gondii infection.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Toxoplasma gondii-induced neuronal alterations. 2015, 37 (3):159-70 Parasite Immunol.
Journal:
Parasite immunology
Issue Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346575
DOI:
10.1111/pim.12157
PubMed ID:
25376390
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1365-3024
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of molecular Infectionbiology (MIBI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorParlog, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSchlüter, Den
dc.contributor.authorDunay, I Ren
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-12T15:46:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-12T15:46:43Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.citationToxoplasma gondii-induced neuronal alterations. 2015, 37 (3):159-70 Parasite Immunol.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-3024en
dc.identifier.pmid25376390en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pim.12157en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/346575en
dc.description.abstractThe zoonotic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii infects over 30% of the human population. The intracellular parasite can persist lifelong in the CNS within neurons modifying their function and structure, thus leading to specific behavioural changes of the host. In recent years, several in vitro studies and murine models have focused on the elucidation of these modifications. Furthermore, investigations of the human population have correlated Toxoplasma seropositivity with changes in neurological functions; however, the complex underlying mechanisms of the subtle behavioural alteration are still not fully understood. The parasites are able to induce direct modifications in the infected cells, for example by altering dopamine metabolism, by functionally silencing neurons as well as by hindering apoptosis. Moreover, indirect effects of the peripheral immune system and alterations of the immune status of the CNS, observed during chronic infection, might also contribute to changes in neuronal connectivity and synaptic plasticity. In this review, we will provide an overview and highlight recent advances, which describe changes in the neuronal function and morphology upon T. gondii infection.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleToxoplasma gondii-induced neuronal alterations.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalParasite immunologyen

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