2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346848
Title:
Murine solid tumours as a novel model to study bacterial biofilm formation in vivo.
Authors:
Pawar, V; Crull, K; Komor, U; Kasnitz, N; Frahm, M; Kocijancic, D; Westphal, K; Leschner, S; Wolf, K; Loessner, H; Rohde, M ( 0000-0003-0522-3580 ) ; Häussler, S; Weiss, S
Abstract:
Bacteria of many species are able to invade and colonize solid tumours in mice. We have focused on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Detailed analysis revealed that such tumour-invading Salmonella form biofilms, thus providing a versatile in vivo test system for studying bacterial phenotypes and host-pathogen interactions. It appears that biofilm formation by S. typhimurium is induced as a defence against the immune system of the host, and in particular against neutrophils. Further, we extended our work to the clinically more relevant biofilm infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The induction of P. aeruginosa biofilms in neoplastic tissue appears to be elicited as a reaction against the immune system. Reconstitution experiments reveal that T cells are responsible for biofilm induction. Isogenic mutants that are no longer able to form biofilms can be used for comparison studies to determine antimicrobial resistance, especially therapeutic efficacy against P. aeruginosa located in biofilms.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Murine solid tumours as a novel model to study bacterial biofilm formation in vivo. 2014, 276 (2):130-9 J. Intern. Med.
Journal:
Journal of internal medicine
Issue Date:
Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346848
DOI:
10.1111/joim.12258
PubMed ID:
24724621
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1365-2796
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group molecular Immunology (MOLI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPawar, Ven
dc.contributor.authorCrull, Ken
dc.contributor.authorKomor, Uen
dc.contributor.authorKasnitz, Nen
dc.contributor.authorFrahm, Men
dc.contributor.authorKocijancic, Den
dc.contributor.authorWestphal, Ken
dc.contributor.authorLeschner, Sen
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Ken
dc.contributor.authorLoessner, Hen
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Men
dc.contributor.authorHäussler, Sen
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Sen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T15:57:47Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-18T15:57:47Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08en
dc.identifier.citationMurine solid tumours as a novel model to study bacterial biofilm formation in vivo. 2014, 276 (2):130-9 J. Intern. Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2796en
dc.identifier.pmid24724621en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/joim.12258en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/346848en
dc.description.abstractBacteria of many species are able to invade and colonize solid tumours in mice. We have focused on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Detailed analysis revealed that such tumour-invading Salmonella form biofilms, thus providing a versatile in vivo test system for studying bacterial phenotypes and host-pathogen interactions. It appears that biofilm formation by S. typhimurium is induced as a defence against the immune system of the host, and in particular against neutrophils. Further, we extended our work to the clinically more relevant biofilm infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The induction of P. aeruginosa biofilms in neoplastic tissue appears to be elicited as a reaction against the immune system. Reconstitution experiments reveal that T cells are responsible for biofilm induction. Isogenic mutants that are no longer able to form biofilms can be used for comparison studies to determine antimicrobial resistance, especially therapeutic efficacy against P. aeruginosa located in biofilms.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntibiosisen
dc.subject.meshBiofilmsen
dc.subject.meshHost-Pathogen Interactionsen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Experimentalen
dc.subject.meshNeutrophilsen
dc.subject.meshPhagocytosisen
dc.subject.meshPseudomonas aeruginosaen
dc.subject.meshSalmonella Infections, Animalen
dc.subject.meshSalmonella typhimuriumen
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytesen
dc.titleMurine solid tumours as a novel model to study bacterial biofilm formation in vivo.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of internal medicineen

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