Staphylococcus aureus phenotype switching: an effective bacterial strategy to escape host immune response and establish a chronic infection.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346878
Title:
Staphylococcus aureus phenotype switching: an effective bacterial strategy to escape host immune response and establish a chronic infection.
Authors:
Tuchscherr, Lorena; Medina, Eva ( 0000-0001-9073-0223 ) ; Hussain, Muzaffar; Völker, Wolfgang; Heitmann, Vanessa; Niemann, Silke; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Proctor, Richard A; Becker, Karsten; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina
Abstract:
Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause for serious, chronic and therapy-refractive infections in spite of susceptibility to antibiotics in vitro. In chronic infections, altered bacterial phenotypes, such as small colony variants (SCVs), have been found. Yet, it is largely unclear whether the ability to interconvert from the wild-type to the SCV phenotype is only a rare clinical and/or just laboratory phenomenon or is essential to sustain an infection. Here, we performed different long-term in vitro and in vivo infection models with S. aureus and we show that viable bacteria can persist within host cells and/or tissues for several weeks. Persistence induced bacterial phenotypic diversity, including SCV phenotypes, accompanied by changes in virulence factor expression and auxotrophism. However, the recovered SCV phenotypes were highly dynamic and rapidly reverted to the fully virulent wild-type form when leaving the intracellular location and infecting new cells. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial phenotype switching is an integral part of the infection process that enables the bacteria to hide inside host cells, which can be a reservoir for chronic and therapy-refractive infections.
Citation:
Staphylococcus aureus phenotype switching: an effective bacterial strategy to escape host immune response and establish a chronic infection. 2011, 3 (3):129-41 EMBO Mol Med
Journal:
EMBO molecular medicine
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/346878
DOI:
10.1002/emmm.201000115
PubMed ID:
21268281
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1757-4684
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group immunology of infection (INI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTuchscherr, Lorenaen
dc.contributor.authorMedina, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Muzaffaren
dc.contributor.authorVölker, Wolfgangen
dc.contributor.authorHeitmann, Vanessaen
dc.contributor.authorNiemann, Silkeen
dc.contributor.authorHolzinger, Dirken
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Johannesen
dc.contributor.authorProctor, Richard Aen
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Karstenen
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Georgen
dc.contributor.authorLöffler, Bettinaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-19T09:21:47Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-19T09:21:47Zen
dc.date.issued2011-03en
dc.identifier.citationStaphylococcus aureus phenotype switching: an effective bacterial strategy to escape host immune response and establish a chronic infection. 2011, 3 (3):129-41 EMBO Mol Meden
dc.identifier.issn1757-4684en
dc.identifier.pmid21268281en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/emmm.201000115en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/346878en
dc.description.abstractStaphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause for serious, chronic and therapy-refractive infections in spite of susceptibility to antibiotics in vitro. In chronic infections, altered bacterial phenotypes, such as small colony variants (SCVs), have been found. Yet, it is largely unclear whether the ability to interconvert from the wild-type to the SCV phenotype is only a rare clinical and/or just laboratory phenomenon or is essential to sustain an infection. Here, we performed different long-term in vitro and in vivo infection models with S. aureus and we show that viable bacteria can persist within host cells and/or tissues for several weeks. Persistence induced bacterial phenotypic diversity, including SCV phenotypes, accompanied by changes in virulence factor expression and auxotrophism. However, the recovered SCV phenotypes were highly dynamic and rapidly reverted to the fully virulent wild-type form when leaving the intracellular location and infecting new cells. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial phenotype switching is an integral part of the infection process that enables the bacteria to hide inside host cells, which can be a reservoir for chronic and therapy-refractive infections.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCell Lineen
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolismen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profilingen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmune Evasionen
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Networks and Pathwaysen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Viabilityen
dc.subject.meshPhagocytesen
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcus aureusen
dc.subject.meshVirulence Factorsen
dc.titleStaphylococcus aureus phenotype switching: an effective bacterial strategy to escape host immune response and establish a chronic infection.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEMBO molecular medicineen

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