Hierarchy of Carbon Source Utilization in Soil Bacteria: Hegemonic Preference for Benzoate in Complex Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis Strain JMP134.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/558740
Title:
Hierarchy of Carbon Source Utilization in Soil Bacteria: Hegemonic Preference for Benzoate in Complex Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis Strain JMP134.
Authors:
Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; Leiva-Novoa, Pablo; Donoso, Raúl A; Little, Cedric; Godoy, Margarita; Pieper, Dietmar H; González, Bernardo
Abstract:
Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134, like many other environmental bacteria, uses a range of aromatic compounds as carbon sources. Previous reports have shown a preference for benzoate when this bacterium grows on binary mixtures composed of this aromatic compound and 4-hydroxybenzoate or phenol. However, this observation has not been extended to other aromatic mixtures resembling a more archetypal context. We carried out a systematic study on the substrate preference of C. pinatubonensis JMP134 growing on representative aromatic compounds channeled through different catabolic pathways described in aerobic bacteria. Growth tests of nearly the entire set of binary combinations and in mixtures composed of 5 or 6 aromatic components showed that benzoate and phenol were always the preferred and deferred growth substrates, respectively. This pattern was supported by kinetic analyses that showed shorter times to initiate consumption of benzoate in aromatic compound mixtures. Gene expression analysis by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) showed that, in all mixtures, the repression by benzoate over other catabolic pathways was exerted mainly at the transcriptional level. Additionally, inhibition of benzoate catabolism suggests that its multiple repressive actions are not mediated by a sole mechanism, as suggested by dissimilar requirements of benzoate degradation for effective repression in different aromatic compound mixtures. The hegemonic preference for benzoate over multiple aromatic carbon sources is not explained on the basis of growth rate and/or biomass yield on each single substrate or by obvious chemical or metabolic properties of these aromatic compounds.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Hierarchy of Carbon Source Utilization in Soil Bacteria: Hegemonic Preference for Benzoate in Complex Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis Strain JMP134. 2015, 81 (12):3914-24 Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Applied and environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
15-Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/558740
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.04207-14
PubMed ID:
25795675
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1098-5336
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPérez-Pantoja, Daniloen
dc.contributor.authorLeiva-Novoa, Pabloen
dc.contributor.authorDonoso, Raúl Aen
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Cedricen
dc.contributor.authorGodoy, Margaritaen
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar Hen
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Bernardoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-01T14:52:33Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-01T14:52:33Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-15en
dc.identifier.citationHierarchy of Carbon Source Utilization in Soil Bacteria: Hegemonic Preference for Benzoate in Complex Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis Strain JMP134. 2015, 81 (12):3914-24 Appl. Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1098-5336en
dc.identifier.pmid25795675en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.04207-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/558740en
dc.description.abstractCupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134, like many other environmental bacteria, uses a range of aromatic compounds as carbon sources. Previous reports have shown a preference for benzoate when this bacterium grows on binary mixtures composed of this aromatic compound and 4-hydroxybenzoate or phenol. However, this observation has not been extended to other aromatic mixtures resembling a more archetypal context. We carried out a systematic study on the substrate preference of C. pinatubonensis JMP134 growing on representative aromatic compounds channeled through different catabolic pathways described in aerobic bacteria. Growth tests of nearly the entire set of binary combinations and in mixtures composed of 5 or 6 aromatic components showed that benzoate and phenol were always the preferred and deferred growth substrates, respectively. This pattern was supported by kinetic analyses that showed shorter times to initiate consumption of benzoate in aromatic compound mixtures. Gene expression analysis by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) showed that, in all mixtures, the repression by benzoate over other catabolic pathways was exerted mainly at the transcriptional level. Additionally, inhibition of benzoate catabolism suggests that its multiple repressive actions are not mediated by a sole mechanism, as suggested by dissimilar requirements of benzoate degradation for effective repression in different aromatic compound mixtures. The hegemonic preference for benzoate over multiple aromatic carbon sources is not explained on the basis of growth rate and/or biomass yield on each single substrate or by obvious chemical or metabolic properties of these aromatic compounds.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleHierarchy of Carbon Source Utilization in Soil Bacteria: Hegemonic Preference for Benzoate in Complex Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis Strain JMP134.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalApplied and environmental microbiologyen

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