Linking microbial community and catabolic gene structures during the adaptation of three contaminated soils under continuous long term pollutant stress.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/596927
Title:
Linking microbial community and catabolic gene structures during the adaptation of three contaminated soils under continuous long term pollutant stress.
Authors:
Lima-Morales, Daiana; Jáuregui, Ruy; Camarinha-Silva, Amelia; Geffers, Robert ( 0000-0003-4409-016X ) ; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vilchez Vargas, Ramiro ( 0000-0002-7220-258X )
Abstract:
Three types of contaminated soil from three geographically different areas were subjected to a constant supply of benzene or benzene/toluene/ethylbenzene/xylenes for a period of 3 months. Different to the soil from Brazil (BRA) and Switzerland (SUI), the Czech Republic (CZE) soil which was previously subjected to intensive in-situ bioremediation displayed only negligible changes in community structure. BRA and SUI soil samples showed a clear succession of phylotypes. A rapid response to benzene stress was observed whereas the response to BTEX pollution was significantly slower. After extended incubation, actinobacterial phylotypes were increasing in relative abundance, indicating their superior fitness to pollution stress. Commonalities, but also differences in the phylotypes were observed. Catabolic gene surveys confirmed the enrichment of actinobacteria by identifying the increase of actinobacterial genes involved in the degradation of pollutants. Proteobacterial phylotypes were increasing in relative abundance in SUI microcosms after short-term stress with benzene, where catabolic gene surveys indicated metabolic routes enriched. Interestingly, CZE soil, despite staying constant in community structure, showed a change in the metabolic net, indicating that a highly adapted community has been enriched, which had to adapt its gene pool to meet novel challenges.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Linking microbial community and catabolic gene structures during the adaptation of three contaminated soils under continuous long term pollutant stress. 2016: Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Applied and environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
5-Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/596927
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.03482-15
PubMed ID:
26850298
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1098-5336
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLima-Morales, Daianaen
dc.contributor.authorJáuregui, Ruyen
dc.contributor.authorCamarinha-Silva, Ameliaen
dc.contributor.authorGeffers, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar Hen
dc.contributor.authorVilchez Vargas, Ramiroen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-22T14:39:38Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-22T14:39:38Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-05en
dc.identifier.citationLinking microbial community and catabolic gene structures during the adaptation of three contaminated soils under continuous long term pollutant stress. 2016: Appl. Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1098-5336en
dc.identifier.pmid26850298en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.03482-15en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/596927en
dc.description.abstractThree types of contaminated soil from three geographically different areas were subjected to a constant supply of benzene or benzene/toluene/ethylbenzene/xylenes for a period of 3 months. Different to the soil from Brazil (BRA) and Switzerland (SUI), the Czech Republic (CZE) soil which was previously subjected to intensive in-situ bioremediation displayed only negligible changes in community structure. BRA and SUI soil samples showed a clear succession of phylotypes. A rapid response to benzene stress was observed whereas the response to BTEX pollution was significantly slower. After extended incubation, actinobacterial phylotypes were increasing in relative abundance, indicating their superior fitness to pollution stress. Commonalities, but also differences in the phylotypes were observed. Catabolic gene surveys confirmed the enrichment of actinobacteria by identifying the increase of actinobacterial genes involved in the degradation of pollutants. Proteobacterial phylotypes were increasing in relative abundance in SUI microcosms after short-term stress with benzene, where catabolic gene surveys indicated metabolic routes enriched. Interestingly, CZE soil, despite staying constant in community structure, showed a change in the metabolic net, indicating that a highly adapted community has been enriched, which had to adapt its gene pool to meet novel challenges.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.titleLinking microbial community and catabolic gene structures during the adaptation of three contaminated soils under continuous long term pollutant stress.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalApplied and environmental microbiologyen

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