2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/599249
Title:
Cyclic di-nucleotides: new era for small molecules as adjuvants.
Authors:
Libanova, Rimma; Becker, Pablo D; Guzmán, Carlos A
Abstract:
The implementation of vaccination as an empiric strategy to protect against infectious diseases was introduced even before the advent of hygiene and antimicrobials in the medical practice. Nevertheless, it was not until a few decades ago that we really started understanding the underlying mechanisms of protection triggered by vaccination. Vaccines were initially based on attenuated or inactivated organisms. Subunit vaccines were then introduced as more refined formulations, exhibiting improved safety profiles. However, purified antigens tend to be poorly immunogenic and often require the use of adjuvants to achieve adequate stimulation of the immune system. Vaccination strategies, such as mucosal administration, also require potent adjuvants to improve performance. In the 1990s, immunologists found that pathogens could be sensed as 'danger signals' by receptors recognizing conserved motifs. Although our knowledge is still limited, tremendous advances were made in the understanding of host defence mechanisms regulated by these evolutionary conserved receptors, and the molecular structures which are recognized by them. This opened a new era in adjuvant development. Some of the latest players arrived to this field are the cyclic di-nucleotides, which are ubiquitous prokaryotic intracellular signalling molecules. This review is focused on their potential for the development of vaccines and immunotherapies.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Cyclic di-nucleotides: new era for small molecules as adjuvants. 2012, 5 (2):168-76 Microb Biotechnol
Journal:
Microbial biotechnology
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/599249
DOI:
10.1111/j.1751-7915.2011.00306.x
PubMed ID:
21958423
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1751-7915
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group vaccinology and applied microbiology (VAC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLibanova, Rimmaen
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Pablo Den
dc.contributor.authorGuzmán, Carlos Aen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T10:25:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-26T10:25:00Zen
dc.date.issued2012-03en
dc.identifier.citationCyclic di-nucleotides: new era for small molecules as adjuvants. 2012, 5 (2):168-76 Microb Biotechnolen
dc.identifier.issn1751-7915en
dc.identifier.pmid21958423en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1751-7915.2011.00306.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/599249en
dc.description.abstractThe implementation of vaccination as an empiric strategy to protect against infectious diseases was introduced even before the advent of hygiene and antimicrobials in the medical practice. Nevertheless, it was not until a few decades ago that we really started understanding the underlying mechanisms of protection triggered by vaccination. Vaccines were initially based on attenuated or inactivated organisms. Subunit vaccines were then introduced as more refined formulations, exhibiting improved safety profiles. However, purified antigens tend to be poorly immunogenic and often require the use of adjuvants to achieve adequate stimulation of the immune system. Vaccination strategies, such as mucosal administration, also require potent adjuvants to improve performance. In the 1990s, immunologists found that pathogens could be sensed as 'danger signals' by receptors recognizing conserved motifs. Although our knowledge is still limited, tremendous advances were made in the understanding of host defence mechanisms regulated by these evolutionary conserved receptors, and the molecular structures which are recognized by them. This opened a new era in adjuvant development. Some of the latest players arrived to this field are the cyclic di-nucleotides, which are ubiquitous prokaryotic intracellular signalling molecules. This review is focused on their potential for the development of vaccines and immunotherapies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/228403en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.meshAdjuvants, Immunologicen
dc.subject.meshNucleotides, Cyclicen
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen
dc.titleCyclic di-nucleotides: new era for small molecules as adjuvants.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalMicrobial biotechnologyen

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