Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/609055
Title:
Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen.
Authors:
Carpentier, Arnaud; Nimgaonkar, Ila; Chu, Virginia; Xia, Yuchen; Hu, Zongyi; Liang, T Jake
Abstract:
The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) including embryonic (ESC) and induced pluripotent (iPSC) stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses) in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.
Affiliation:
Twincore, Institute for Experimental Virology, Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen. 2016, 16 (3):640-650 Stem Cell Res
Journal:
Stem cell research
Issue Date:
29-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/609055
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2016.03.009
PubMed ID:
27062358
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1876-7753
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department experimental Virology([TC]EVIR)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarpentier, Arnauden
dc.contributor.authorNimgaonkar, Ilaen
dc.contributor.authorChu, Virginiaen
dc.contributor.authorXia, Yuchenen
dc.contributor.authorHu, Zongyien
dc.contributor.authorLiang, T Jakeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-11T14:20:35Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-11T14:20:35Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-29en
dc.identifier.citationHepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen. 2016, 16 (3):640-650 Stem Cell Resen
dc.identifier.issn1876-7753en
dc.identifier.pmid27062358en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scr.2016.03.009en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/609055en
dc.description.abstractThe establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) including embryonic (ESC) and induced pluripotent (iPSC) stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses) in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.titleHepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTwincore, Institute for Experimental Virology, Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalStem cell researchen

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