Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/617268
Title:
Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model.
Authors:
Otte, Anna; Marriott, Anthony C; Dreier, Carola; Dove, Brian; Mooren, Kyra; Klingen, Thorsten R; Sauter, Martina; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Bennett, Allan; Klingel, Karin; van Riel, Debby; McHardy, Alice C; Carroll, Miles W; Gabriel, Gülsah
Abstract:
There is increasing evidence that 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to severe epidemics in subsequent waves. However, it still remains unclear which viral determinants might have contributed to disease severity after pandemic initiation. Here, we show that distinct mutations in the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus genome have occurred with increased frequency after pandemic declaration. Among those, a mutation in the viral hemagglutinin was identified that increases 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus binding to human-like α2,6-linked sialic acids. Moreover, these mutations conferred increased viral replication in the respiratory tract and elevated respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets. Thus, our data show that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to novel virus variants that enhance viral replicative fitness and respiratory droplet transmission in a mammalian animal model. These findings might help to improve surveillance efforts to assess the pandemic risk by emerging influenza viruses.
Affiliation:
Viral Zoonoses and Adaptation, Heinrich Pette Institute, Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology, Hamburg, Germany.
Citation:
Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model. 2016, 6:28583 Sci Rep
Journal:
Scientific reports
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/617268
DOI:
10.1038/srep28583
PubMed ID:
27339001
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2045-2322
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group bioinformatics in infection research ([BRICS] BIFO)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOtte, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorMarriott, Anthony Cen
dc.contributor.authorDreier, Carolaen
dc.contributor.authorDove, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorMooren, Kyraen
dc.contributor.authorKlingen, Thorsten Ren
dc.contributor.authorSauter, Martinaen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Katy-Anneen
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Allanen
dc.contributor.authorKlingel, Karinen
dc.contributor.authorvan Riel, Debbyen
dc.contributor.authorMcHardy, Alice Cen
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Miles Wen
dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Gülsahen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-20T14:57:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-20T14:57:59Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationEvolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model. 2016, 6:28583 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.pmid27339001-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep28583-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/617268-
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence that 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to severe epidemics in subsequent waves. However, it still remains unclear which viral determinants might have contributed to disease severity after pandemic initiation. Here, we show that distinct mutations in the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus genome have occurred with increased frequency after pandemic declaration. Among those, a mutation in the viral hemagglutinin was identified that increases 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus binding to human-like α2,6-linked sialic acids. Moreover, these mutations conferred increased viral replication in the respiratory tract and elevated respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets. Thus, our data show that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to novel virus variants that enhance viral replicative fitness and respiratory droplet transmission in a mammalian animal model. These findings might help to improve surveillance efforts to assess the pandemic risk by emerging influenza viruses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleEvolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentViral Zoonoses and Adaptation, Heinrich Pette Institute, Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology, Hamburg, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen

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