Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/617683
Title:
Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship.
Authors:
Milici, Mathias; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Decelle, Johan; Jáuregui, Ruy; Wang, Hui; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Plumeier, Iris; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Badewien, Thomas H; Wurst, Mascha; Pieper, Dietmar H; Simon, Meinhard; Wagner-Döbler, Irene
Abstract:
In order to determine the influence of geographical distance, depth, and Longhurstian province on bacterial community composition and compare it with the composition of photosynthetic micro-eukaryote communities, 382 samples from a depth-resolved latitudinal transect (51°S-47°N) from the epipelagic zone of the Atlantic ocean were analyzed by Illumina amplicon sequencing. In the upper 100 m of the ocean, community similarity decreased toward the equator for 6000 km, but subsequently increased again, reaching similarity values of 40-60% for samples that were separated by ~12,000 km, resulting in a U-shaped distance-decay curve. We conclude that adaptation to local conditions can override the linear distance-decay relationship in the upper epipelagial of the Atlantic Ocean which is apparently not restrained by barriers to dispersal, since the same taxa were shared between the most distant communities. The six Longhurstian provinces covered by the transect were comprised of distinct microbial communities; ~30% of variation in community composition could be explained by province. Bacterial communities belonging to the deeper layer of the epipelagic zone (140-200 m) lacked a distance-decay relationship altogether and showed little provincialism. Interestingly, those biogeographical patterns were consistently found for bacteria from three different size fractions of the plankton with different taxonomic composition, indicating conserved underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that phytoplankton composition was strongly correlated with both free-living and particle associated bacterial community composition (R between 0.51 and 0.62, p < 0.002). The data show that biogeographical patterns commonly found in macroecology do not hold for marine bacterioplankton, most likely because dispersal and evolution occur at drastically different rates in bacteria.
Affiliation:
Helmholtzzentrum für Infektionsforschung, 38124 Braunschweig
Citation:
Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship. 2016, 7:590 Front Microbiol
Journal:
Frontiers in microbiology
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/617683
DOI:
10.3389/fmicb.2016.00590
PubMed ID:
27199923
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1664-302X
Appears in Collections:
collections of the research group microbial communication (KOM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMilici, Mathiasen
dc.contributor.authorTomasch, Jürgenen
dc.contributor.authorWos-Oxley, Melissa Len
dc.contributor.authorDecelle, Johanen
dc.contributor.authorJáuregui, Ruyen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Huien
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Zhi-Luoen
dc.contributor.authorPlumeier, Irisen
dc.contributor.authorGiebel, Helge-Ansgaren
dc.contributor.authorBadewien, Thomas Hen
dc.contributor.authorWurst, Maschaen
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar Hen
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Meinharden
dc.contributor.authorWagner-Döbler, Ireneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T11:33:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-28T11:33:39Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationBacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship. 2016, 7:590 Front Microbiolen
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X-
dc.identifier.pmid27199923-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2016.00590-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/617683-
dc.description.abstractIn order to determine the influence of geographical distance, depth, and Longhurstian province on bacterial community composition and compare it with the composition of photosynthetic micro-eukaryote communities, 382 samples from a depth-resolved latitudinal transect (51°S-47°N) from the epipelagic zone of the Atlantic ocean were analyzed by Illumina amplicon sequencing. In the upper 100 m of the ocean, community similarity decreased toward the equator for 6000 km, but subsequently increased again, reaching similarity values of 40-60% for samples that were separated by ~12,000 km, resulting in a U-shaped distance-decay curve. We conclude that adaptation to local conditions can override the linear distance-decay relationship in the upper epipelagial of the Atlantic Ocean which is apparently not restrained by barriers to dispersal, since the same taxa were shared between the most distant communities. The six Longhurstian provinces covered by the transect were comprised of distinct microbial communities; ~30% of variation in community composition could be explained by province. Bacterial communities belonging to the deeper layer of the epipelagic zone (140-200 m) lacked a distance-decay relationship altogether and showed little provincialism. Interestingly, those biogeographical patterns were consistently found for bacteria from three different size fractions of the plankton with different taxonomic composition, indicating conserved underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that phytoplankton composition was strongly correlated with both free-living and particle associated bacterial community composition (R between 0.51 and 0.62, p < 0.002). The data show that biogeographical patterns commonly found in macroecology do not hold for marine bacterioplankton, most likely because dispersal and evolution occur at drastically different rates in bacteria.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleBacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtzzentrum für Infektionsforschung, 38124 Braunschweigen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in microbiologyen

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