2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/619101
Title:
The culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns.
Authors:
Kaspar, Ursula; Kriegeskorte, André; Schubert, Tanja; Peters, Georg; Rudack, Claudia; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wos-Oxley, Melissa; Becker, Karsten
Abstract:
The complex anatomy of the human nose might offer distinct microbial niches. Microbiota composition may affect nose inflammatory diseases and Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Considering different nasal cavity locations, microbial colonization was analysed across individuals exhibiting chronic nasal inflammatory diseases (n = 18) and those without local inflammation signs (n = 16). Samples were collected systematically during surgery and examined by an extensive culture-based approach and, for a subset, by 16S rRNA gene community profiling. Cultivation yielded 141 taxa with members of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium as most common isolates comprising the nasal core culturome together with Finegoldia magna. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently found in association with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, and the posterior vestibules were redefined as S. aureus' principle habitat. Culturome analysis revealed host-specific bacterial 'fingerprints' irrespective of host-driven factors or intranasal sites. Comparisons between cultivable and molecular fingerprints demonstrated that only a small fraction of phylotypes (6.2%) was correlated. While the total number of different phylotypes was higher in the molecular dataset, the total number of identifications down to the species level was higher in the culturomic approach. To determine host-specific microbiomes, the advantages of molecular approaches should be combined with the resolution and reliability of species identification by culturomic analyses.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
The culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns. 2016, 18 (7):2130-42 Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/619101
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.12891
PubMed ID:
25923378
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-2920
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaspar, Ursulaen
dc.contributor.authorKriegeskorte, Andréen
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Tanjaen
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Georgen
dc.contributor.authorRudack, Claudiaen
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar Hen
dc.contributor.authorWos-Oxley, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Karstenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T10:02:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T10:02:35Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-
dc.identifier.citationThe culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns. 2016, 18 (7):2130-42 Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920-
dc.identifier.pmid25923378-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.12891-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/619101-
dc.description.abstractThe complex anatomy of the human nose might offer distinct microbial niches. Microbiota composition may affect nose inflammatory diseases and Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Considering different nasal cavity locations, microbial colonization was analysed across individuals exhibiting chronic nasal inflammatory diseases (n = 18) and those without local inflammation signs (n = 16). Samples were collected systematically during surgery and examined by an extensive culture-based approach and, for a subset, by 16S rRNA gene community profiling. Cultivation yielded 141 taxa with members of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium as most common isolates comprising the nasal core culturome together with Finegoldia magna. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently found in association with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, and the posterior vestibules were redefined as S. aureus' principle habitat. Culturome analysis revealed host-specific bacterial 'fingerprints' irrespective of host-driven factors or intranasal sites. Comparisons between cultivable and molecular fingerprints demonstrated that only a small fraction of phylotypes (6.2%) was correlated. While the total number of different phylotypes was higher in the molecular dataset, the total number of identifications down to the species level was higher in the culturomic approach. To determine host-specific microbiomes, the advantages of molecular approaches should be combined with the resolution and reliability of species identification by culturomic analyses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleThe culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.