2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/619127
Title:
Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.
Authors:
Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Jáuregui, Ruy; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kaspar, Ursula; Plumeier, Iris; Kahl, Silke; Rudack, Claudia; Becker, Karsten; Pieper, Dietmar H
Abstract:
The human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage. 2016, 18 (7):2259-71 Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/619127
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.13378
PubMed ID:
27207744
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-2920
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWos-Oxley, Melissa Len
dc.contributor.authorChaves-Moreno, Diegoen
dc.contributor.authorJáuregui, Ruyen
dc.contributor.authorOxley, Andrew P Aen
dc.contributor.authorKaspar, Ursulaen
dc.contributor.authorPlumeier, Irisen
dc.contributor.authorKahl, Silkeen
dc.contributor.authorRudack, Claudiaen
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Karstenen
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar Hen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T13:10:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T13:10:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-
dc.identifier.citationExploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage. 2016, 18 (7):2259-71 Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920-
dc.identifier.pmid27207744-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.13378-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/619127-
dc.description.abstractThe human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleExploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen

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