Amphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620798
Title:
Amphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions.
Authors:
Bletz, Molly C; Goedbloed, Daniel J; Sanchez, Eugenia; Reinhardt, Timm; Tebbe, Christoph C; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert ( 0000-0003-4409-016X ) ; Jarek, Michael; Vences, Miguel; Steinfartz, Sebastian
Abstract:
Complex microbial communities inhabit vertebrate digestive systems but thorough understanding of the ecological dynamics and functions of host-associated microbiota within natural habitats is limited. We investigate the role of environmental conditions in shaping gut and skin microbiota under natural conditions by performing a field survey and reciprocal transfer experiments with salamander larvae inhabiting two distinct habitats (ponds and streams). We show that gut and skin microbiota are habitat-specific, demonstrating environmental factors mediate community structure. Reciprocal transfer reveals that gut microbiota, but not skin microbiota, responds differentially to environmental change. Stream-to-pond larvae shift their gut microbiota to that of pond-to-pond larvae, whereas pond-to-stream larvae change to a community structure distinct from both habitat controls. Predicted functions, however, match that of larvae from the destination habitats in both cases. Thus, microbial function can be matched without taxonomic coherence and gut microbiota appears to exhibit metagenomic plasticity.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research. Inhoffenstr. 7. 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Amphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions. 2016, 7:13699 Nat Commun
Journal:
Nature communications
Issue Date:
15-Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620798
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms13699
PubMed ID:
27976718
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2041-1723
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group genomeanalytics (GMAK)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBletz, Molly Cen
dc.contributor.authorGoedbloed, Daniel Jen
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Eugeniaen
dc.contributor.authorReinhardt, Timmen
dc.contributor.authorTebbe, Christoph Cen
dc.contributor.authorBhuju, Sabinen
dc.contributor.authorGeffers, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorJarek, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorVences, Miguelen
dc.contributor.authorSteinfartz, Sebastianen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T12:24:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-31T12:24:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-15-
dc.identifier.citationAmphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions. 2016, 7:13699 Nat Communen
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.pmid27976718-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms13699-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620798-
dc.description.abstractComplex microbial communities inhabit vertebrate digestive systems but thorough understanding of the ecological dynamics and functions of host-associated microbiota within natural habitats is limited. We investigate the role of environmental conditions in shaping gut and skin microbiota under natural conditions by performing a field survey and reciprocal transfer experiments with salamander larvae inhabiting two distinct habitats (ponds and streams). We show that gut and skin microbiota are habitat-specific, demonstrating environmental factors mediate community structure. Reciprocal transfer reveals that gut microbiota, but not skin microbiota, responds differentially to environmental change. Stream-to-pond larvae shift their gut microbiota to that of pond-to-pond larvae, whereas pond-to-stream larvae change to a community structure distinct from both habitat controls. Predicted functions, however, match that of larvae from the destination habitats in both cases. Thus, microbial function can be matched without taxonomic coherence and gut microbiota appears to exhibit metagenomic plasticity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleAmphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research. Inhoffenstr. 7. 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalNature communicationsen

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HZI are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.