Self-collected nasal swabs to detect infection and colonization: a useful tool for population-based epidemiological studies?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620821
Title:
Self-collected nasal swabs to detect infection and colonization: a useful tool for population-based epidemiological studies?
Authors:
Akmatov, M K; Pessler, F
Abstract:
Population-based epidemiological studies on infectious diseases are limited by methodological problems that may not be encountered in other fields of epidemiology. The acute or asymptomatic nature of many infections hinders a timely diagnosis by trained personnel in a study centre, indicating the need for new collection methods of biological specimens. One alternative approach is to have the participants collect the specimens themselves, for instance nasal swabs for the detection of bacterial or viral pathogens. Although self-collection is widely accepted in clinical studies of specific populations (e.g., self-collection of vaginal swabs by young women to diagnose sexually transmitted infections), it has not been employed much in population-based studies. Here, we review recent experience with self-collection of nasal swabs for the detection of microorganisms and discuss future prospects and applications for this technique.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Self-collected nasal swabs to detect infection and colonization: a useful tool for population-based epidemiological studies? 2011, 15 (9):e589-93 Int. J. Infect. Dis.
Journal:
International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
Issue Date:
Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620821
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2011.04.009
PubMed ID:
21641847
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1878-3511
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department infection genetics (INFG)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAkmatov, M Ken
dc.contributor.authorPessler, Fen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T15:39:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-15T15:39:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-
dc.identifier.citationSelf-collected nasal swabs to detect infection and colonization: a useful tool for population-based epidemiological studies? 2011, 15 (9):e589-93 Int. J. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1878-3511-
dc.identifier.pmid21641847-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2011.04.009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620821-
dc.description.abstractPopulation-based epidemiological studies on infectious diseases are limited by methodological problems that may not be encountered in other fields of epidemiology. The acute or asymptomatic nature of many infections hinders a timely diagnosis by trained personnel in a study centre, indicating the need for new collection methods of biological specimens. One alternative approach is to have the participants collect the specimens themselves, for instance nasal swabs for the detection of bacterial or viral pathogens. Although self-collection is widely accepted in clinical studies of specific populations (e.g., self-collection of vaginal swabs by young women to diagnose sexually transmitted infections), it has not been employed much in population-based studies. Here, we review recent experience with self-collection of nasal swabs for the detection of microorganisms and discuss future prospects and applications for this technique.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshBiopsyen
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshNasal Cavityen
dc.subject.meshSelf Careen
dc.titleSelf-collected nasal swabs to detect infection and colonization: a useful tool for population-based epidemiological studies?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseasesen

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