Metabolites: deciphering the molecular language between DCs and their environment.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620874
Title:
Metabolites: deciphering the molecular language between DCs and their environment.
Authors:
Minarrieta, Lucía; Ghorbani, Peyman; Sparwasser, Tim ( 0000-0001-5645-902X ) ; Berod, Luciana
Abstract:
Dendritic cells (DCs) determine the outcome of the immune response based on signals they receive from the environment. Presentation of antigen under various contexts can lead to activation and differentiation of T cells for immunity or dampening of immune responses by establishing tolerance, primarily through the priming of regulatory T cells. Infections, inflammation and normal cellular interactions shape DC responses through direct contact or via cytokine signaling. Although it is widely accepted that DCs sense microbial components through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), increasing evidence advocates for the existence of a set of signals that can profoundly shape DC function via PRR-independent pathways. This diverse group of host- or commensal-derived metabolites represents a newly appreciated code from which DCs can interpret environmental cues. In this review, we discuss the existing information on the effect of some of the most studied metabolites on DC function, together with the implications this may have in immune-mediated diseases.
Affiliation:
Twincore Centre of Experimental and Clinical Infection Research; a joint venture between the Hannover Medical School and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover 30625, Germany.
Citation:
Metabolites: deciphering the molecular language between DCs and their environment. 2017, 39 (2):177-198 Semin Immunopathol
Journal:
Seminars in immunopathology
Issue Date:
Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620874
DOI:
10.1007/s00281-016-0609-6
PubMed ID:
27921148
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1863-2300
Appears in Collections:
publications of the TwinCore unit Infection immunology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMinarrieta, Lucíaen
dc.contributor.authorGhorbani, Peymanen
dc.contributor.authorSparwasser, Timen
dc.contributor.authorBerod, Lucianaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-29T09:17:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-29T09:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-
dc.identifier.citationMetabolites: deciphering the molecular language between DCs and their environment. 2017, 39 (2):177-198 Semin Immunopatholen
dc.identifier.issn1863-2300-
dc.identifier.pmid27921148-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00281-016-0609-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620874-
dc.description.abstractDendritic cells (DCs) determine the outcome of the immune response based on signals they receive from the environment. Presentation of antigen under various contexts can lead to activation and differentiation of T cells for immunity or dampening of immune responses by establishing tolerance, primarily through the priming of regulatory T cells. Infections, inflammation and normal cellular interactions shape DC responses through direct contact or via cytokine signaling. Although it is widely accepted that DCs sense microbial components through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), increasing evidence advocates for the existence of a set of signals that can profoundly shape DC function via PRR-independent pathways. This diverse group of host- or commensal-derived metabolites represents a newly appreciated code from which DCs can interpret environmental cues. In this review, we discuss the existing information on the effect of some of the most studied metabolites on DC function, together with the implications this may have in immune-mediated diseases.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleMetabolites: deciphering the molecular language between DCs and their environment.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTwincore Centre of Experimental and Clinical Infection Research; a joint venture between the Hannover Medical School and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Hannover 30625, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalSeminars in immunopathologyen
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