2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620940
Title:
[Intestinal microbiota in individualized therapies].
Authors:
Witte, T; Pieper, D H; Heidrich, B
Abstract:
During recent years, the analysis of the human microbiota has been receiving more and more scientific focus. Deep sequencing analysis enables characterization of microbial communities in different environments without the need of culture-based methods. Hereby, information about microbial communities is increasing enormously. Numerous studies in humans and animal models revealed the important role of the microbiome in emergence and natural course of diseases such as autoimmune diseases and metabolic disorders, e. g., the metabolic syndrome. The identification of causalities between the intestinal microbiota composition and function, and diseases in humans and animal models can help to develop individualized therapies targeting the microbiome and its modification. Nowadays, it is established that several factors influence the composition of the microbiota. Diet it is one of the major factors shaping the microbiota and the use of pro- and prebiotica may induce changes in the microbial community. Fecal microbiome transfer is the first approach targeting the intestinal microbiota which is implemented in the clinical routine for patients with therapy-refractory infections with Clostridium difficile. Herewith, the recipient's microbiota can be changed permanently and the patient can be cured from the infection.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7., 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
[Intestinal microbiota in individualized therapies]. 2017 Internist (Berl)
Journal:
Der Internist
Issue Date:
24-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620940
DOI:
10.1007/s00108-017-0259-3
PubMed ID:
28540475
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1432-1289
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group microbial interactions and processes (MINP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWitte, Ten
dc.contributor.authorPieper, D Hen
dc.contributor.authorHeidrich, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-12T07:59:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-12T07:59:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-24-
dc.identifier.citation[Intestinal microbiota in individualized therapies]. 2017 Internist (Berl)en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1289-
dc.identifier.pmid28540475-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00108-017-0259-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620940-
dc.description.abstractDuring recent years, the analysis of the human microbiota has been receiving more and more scientific focus. Deep sequencing analysis enables characterization of microbial communities in different environments without the need of culture-based methods. Hereby, information about microbial communities is increasing enormously. Numerous studies in humans and animal models revealed the important role of the microbiome in emergence and natural course of diseases such as autoimmune diseases and metabolic disorders, e. g., the metabolic syndrome. The identification of causalities between the intestinal microbiota composition and function, and diseases in humans and animal models can help to develop individualized therapies targeting the microbiome and its modification. Nowadays, it is established that several factors influence the composition of the microbiota. Diet it is one of the major factors shaping the microbiota and the use of pro- and prebiotica may induce changes in the microbial community. Fecal microbiome transfer is the first approach targeting the intestinal microbiota which is implemented in the clinical routine for patients with therapy-refractory infections with Clostridium difficile. Herewith, the recipient's microbiota can be changed permanently and the patient can be cured from the infection.en
dc.languageger-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.title[Intestinal microbiota in individualized therapies].
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7., 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalDer Internisten

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