Erythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620974
Title:
Erythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults.
Authors:
Hootman, Katie C; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Kraemer, Lisa; Burwell, Lindsay S; Dong, Xiangyi; Guertin, Kristin A; Jaeger, Christian; Stover, Patrick J; Hiller, Karsten; Cassano, Patricia A
Abstract:
Metabolomic markers associated with incident central adiposity gain were investigated in young adults. In a 9-mo prospective study of university freshmen (n = 264). Blood samples and anthropometry measurements were collected in the first 3 d on campus and at the end of the year. Plasma from individuals was pooled by phenotype [incident central adiposity, stable adiposity, baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) > 5.05%, HbA1c < 4.92%] and assayed using GC-MS, chromatograms were analyzed using MetaboliteDetector software, and normalized metabolite levels were compared using Welch's t test. Assays were repeated using freshly prepared pools, and statistically significant metabolites were quantified in a targeted GC-MS approach. Isotope tracer studies were performed to determine if the potential marker was an endogenous human metabolite in men and in whole blood. Participants with incident central adiposity gain had statistically significantly higher blood erythritol [P < 0.001, false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.0435], and the targeted assay revealed 15-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.27, 16.25] higher blood erythritol compared with participants with stable adiposity. Participants with baseline HbA1c > 5.05% had 21-fold (95% CI: 19.84, 21.41) higher blood erythritol compared with participants with lower HbA1c (P < 0.001, FDR = 0.00016). Erythritol was shown to be synthesized endogenously from glucose via the pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) in stable isotope-assisted ex vivo blood incubation experiments and through in vivo conversion of erythritol to erythronate in stable isotope-assisted dried blood spot experiments. Therefore, endogenous production of erythritol from glucose may contribute to the association between erythritol and obesity observed in young adults.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Erythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults. 2017, 114 (21):E4233-E4240 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
Journal:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Issue Date:
23-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/620974
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1620079114
PubMed ID:
28484010
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1091-6490
Appears in Collections:
Publications of Scientific Director (GFW)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHootman, Katie Cen
dc.contributor.authorTrezzi, Jean-Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorKraemer, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorBurwell, Lindsay Sen
dc.contributor.authorDong, Xiangyien
dc.contributor.authorGuertin, Kristin Aen
dc.contributor.authorJaeger, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorStover, Patrick Jen
dc.contributor.authorHiller, Karstenen
dc.contributor.authorCassano, Patricia Aen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T11:59:55Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-22T11:59:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-23-
dc.identifier.citationErythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults. 2017, 114 (21):E4233-E4240 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.en
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490-
dc.identifier.pmid28484010-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1620079114-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/620974-
dc.description.abstractMetabolomic markers associated with incident central adiposity gain were investigated in young adults. In a 9-mo prospective study of university freshmen (n = 264). Blood samples and anthropometry measurements were collected in the first 3 d on campus and at the end of the year. Plasma from individuals was pooled by phenotype [incident central adiposity, stable adiposity, baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) > 5.05%, HbA1c < 4.92%] and assayed using GC-MS, chromatograms were analyzed using MetaboliteDetector software, and normalized metabolite levels were compared using Welch's t test. Assays were repeated using freshly prepared pools, and statistically significant metabolites were quantified in a targeted GC-MS approach. Isotope tracer studies were performed to determine if the potential marker was an endogenous human metabolite in men and in whole blood. Participants with incident central adiposity gain had statistically significantly higher blood erythritol [P < 0.001, false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.0435], and the targeted assay revealed 15-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.27, 16.25] higher blood erythritol compared with participants with stable adiposity. Participants with baseline HbA1c > 5.05% had 21-fold (95% CI: 19.84, 21.41) higher blood erythritol compared with participants with lower HbA1c (P < 0.001, FDR = 0.00016). Erythritol was shown to be synthesized endogenously from glucose via the pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) in stable isotope-assisted ex vivo blood incubation experiments and through in vivo conversion of erythritol to erythronate in stable isotope-assisted dried blood spot experiments. Therefore, endogenous production of erythritol from glucose may contribute to the association between erythritol and obesity observed in young adults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleErythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen

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