Study of three interesting Amanita species from Thailand: Morphology, multiple-gene phylogeny and toxin analysis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621062
Title:
Study of three interesting Amanita species from Thailand: Morphology, multiple-gene phylogeny and toxin analysis.
Authors:
Thongbai, Benjarong; Miller, Steven L; Stadler, Marc ( 0000-0002-7284-8671 ) ; Wittstein, Kathrin; Hyde, Kevin D; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Raspé, Olivier
Abstract:
Amanita ballerina and A. brunneitoxicaria spp. nov. are introduced from Thailand. Amanita fuligineoides is also reported for the first time from Thailand, increasing the known distribution of this taxon. Together, those findings support our view that many taxa are yet to be discovered in the region. While both morphological characters and a multiple-gene phylogeny clearly place A. brunneitoxicaria and A. fuligineoides in sect. Phalloideae (Fr.) Quél., the placement of A. ballerina is problematic. On the one hand, the morphology of A. ballerina shows clear affinities with stirps Limbatula of sect. Lepidella. On the other hand, in a multiple-gene phylogeny including taxa of all sections in subg. Lepidella, A. ballerina and two other species, including A. zangii, form a well-supported clade sister to the Phalloideae sensu Bas 1969, which include the lethal "death caps" and "destroying angels". Together, the A. ballerina-A. zangii clade and the Phalloideae sensu Bas 1969 also form a well-supported clade. We therefore screened for two of the most notorious toxins by HPLC-MS analysis of methanolic extracts from the basidiomata. Interestingly, neither α-amanitin nor phalloidin was found in A. ballerina, whereas Amanita fuligineoides was confirmed to contain both α-amanitin and phalloidin, and A. brunneitoxicaria contained only α-amanitin. Together with unique morphological characteristics, the position in the phylogeny indicates that A. ballerina is either an important link in the evolution of the deadly Amanita sect. Phalloideae species, or a member of a new section also including A. zangii.
Affiliation:
Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Study of three interesting Amanita species from Thailand: Morphology, multiple-gene phylogeny and toxin analysis. 2017, 12 (8):e0182131 PLoS ONE
Journal:
PloS one
Issue Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621062
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0182131
PubMed ID:
28767681
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
publications of the department of microbial drugs (MWIS)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThongbai, Benjarongen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Steven Len
dc.contributor.authorStadler, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorWittstein, Kathrinen
dc.contributor.authorHyde, Kevin Den
dc.contributor.authorLumyong, Saisamornen
dc.contributor.authorRaspé, Olivieren
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T12:23:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-17T12:23:14Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationStudy of three interesting Amanita species from Thailand: Morphology, multiple-gene phylogeny and toxin analysis. 2017, 12 (8):e0182131 PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid28767681-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0182131-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621062-
dc.description.abstractAmanita ballerina and A. brunneitoxicaria spp. nov. are introduced from Thailand. Amanita fuligineoides is also reported for the first time from Thailand, increasing the known distribution of this taxon. Together, those findings support our view that many taxa are yet to be discovered in the region. While both morphological characters and a multiple-gene phylogeny clearly place A. brunneitoxicaria and A. fuligineoides in sect. Phalloideae (Fr.) Quél., the placement of A. ballerina is problematic. On the one hand, the morphology of A. ballerina shows clear affinities with stirps Limbatula of sect. Lepidella. On the other hand, in a multiple-gene phylogeny including taxa of all sections in subg. Lepidella, A. ballerina and two other species, including A. zangii, form a well-supported clade sister to the Phalloideae sensu Bas 1969, which include the lethal "death caps" and "destroying angels". Together, the A. ballerina-A. zangii clade and the Phalloideae sensu Bas 1969 also form a well-supported clade. We therefore screened for two of the most notorious toxins by HPLC-MS analysis of methanolic extracts from the basidiomata. Interestingly, neither α-amanitin nor phalloidin was found in A. ballerina, whereas Amanita fuligineoides was confirmed to contain both α-amanitin and phalloidin, and A. brunneitoxicaria contained only α-amanitin. Together with unique morphological characteristics, the position in the phylogeny indicates that A. ballerina is either an important link in the evolution of the deadly Amanita sect. Phalloideae species, or a member of a new section also including A. zangii.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleStudy of three interesting Amanita species from Thailand: Morphology, multiple-gene phylogeny and toxin analysis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen

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