Assessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621077
Title:
Assessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure.
Authors:
Pfaender, Stephanie; Walter, Stephanie; Todt, Daniel; Behrendt, Patrick; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Wölk, Benno; Engelmann, Michael; Gravemann, Ute; Seltsam, Axel; Steinmann, Joerg; Burbelo, Peter D; Klawonn, Frank; Feige, Karsten; Pietschmann, Thomas; Cavalleri, Jessika-M V; Steinmann, Eike ( 0000-0002-8771-4262 )
Abstract:
The recent discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related viruses in different animal species has raised new speculations regarding the origin of HCV and the possibility of a zoonotic source responsible for the endemic HCV transmission. As a consequence, these new findings prompt questions regarding the potential for cross-species transmissions of hepaciviruses. The closest relatives to HCV discovered to date are the non-primate hepaciviruses (NPHVs), which have been described to infect horses. To evaluate the risk of a potential zoonotic transmission, we analysed NPHV RNA and antibodies in humans with occupational exposure to horses in comparison with a low-risk group. Both groups were negative for NPHV RNA, even though low seroreactivities against various NPHV antigens could be detected irrespective of the group. In conclusion, we did not observe evidence of NPHV transmission between horses and humans.
Affiliation:
TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
Citation:
Assessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure. 2015, 96 (9):2636-42 J. Gen. Virol.
Journal:
The Journal of general virology
Issue Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621077
DOI:
10.1099/vir.0.000208
PubMed ID:
26041875
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1465-2099
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group cellular proteom research (CPRO); publications of the department experimental Virology([TC]EVIR); publications of the research group virus transmission ([TC]VIRT)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPfaender, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorWalter, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorTodt, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorBehrendt, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorDoerrbecker, Julianeen
dc.contributor.authorWölk, Bennoen
dc.contributor.authorEngelmann, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorGravemann, Uteen
dc.contributor.authorSeltsam, Axelen
dc.contributor.authorSteinmann, Joergen
dc.contributor.authorBurbelo, Peter Den
dc.contributor.authorKlawonn, Franken
dc.contributor.authorFeige, Karstenen
dc.contributor.authorPietschmann, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorCavalleri, Jessika-M Ven
dc.contributor.authorSteinmann, Eikeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-29T08:45:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-29T08:45:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-
dc.identifier.citationAssessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure. 2015, 96 (9):2636-42 J. Gen. Virol.en
dc.identifier.issn1465-2099-
dc.identifier.pmid26041875-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/vir.0.000208-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621077-
dc.description.abstractThe recent discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related viruses in different animal species has raised new speculations regarding the origin of HCV and the possibility of a zoonotic source responsible for the endemic HCV transmission. As a consequence, these new findings prompt questions regarding the potential for cross-species transmissions of hepaciviruses. The closest relatives to HCV discovered to date are the non-primate hepaciviruses (NPHVs), which have been described to infect horses. To evaluate the risk of a potential zoonotic transmission, we analysed NPHV RNA and antibodies in humans with occupational exposure to horses in comparison with a low-risk group. Both groups were negative for NPHV RNA, even though low seroreactivities against various NPHV antigens could be detected irrespective of the group. In conclusion, we did not observe evidence of NPHV transmission between horses and humans.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/281473en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgricultural Workers' Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHepacivirusen
dc.subject.meshHepatitis Cen
dc.subject.meshHorse Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshHorsesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposureen
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen
dc.subject.meshZoonosesen
dc.titleAssessment of cross-species transmission of hepatitis C virus-related non-primate hepacivirus in a population of humans at high risk of exposure.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of general virologyen

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